Commit eb8a05b2 authored by Burkhard Lück's avatar Burkhard Lück

spellcheck

svn path=/trunk/KDE/kdeedu/doc/kmplot/; revision=871830
parent c28556b1
......@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@
</menuchoice></term>
<listitem>
<para>Select a graph and the x-values in the new dialog that appears.
Calulates the integral and draws the area between the graph and the x-axis in the
Calculates the integral and draws the area between the graph and the x-axis in the
range of the selected x-values in the color of the graph.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
......
<chapter id="dcop">
<title>Scripting &kmplot;</title>
<para>A new feature in &kde; 3.4 is that you can write scripts for &kmplot; using DBus in &kde; 4. For example, if you want to define a new function <userinput>f(x)=2sin x+3cos x</userinput>, set its line width to 20 and then draw it, you type in a console:</para>
<para>A new feature in &kde; 3.4 is that you can write scripts for &kmplot; using &DBus; in &kde; 4. For example, if you want to define a new function <userinput>f(x)=2sin x+3cos
x</userinput>, set its line width to 20 and then draw it, you type in a console:</para>
<para><command>qdbus org.kde.kmplot-PID /parser org.kde.kmplot.Parser.addFunction "f(x)=2sin x+3cos x" ""</command>
As a result, the new function's id number will be returned, or -1 if the function could not be defined.</para>
<para><command>qdbus org.kde.kmplot-PID /parser org.kde.kmplot.Parser.setFunctionFLineWidth ID 20</command>
......@@ -352,7 +353,7 @@
/parser org.kde.kmplot.Parser.functionMinValue id
</term>
<listitem>
<para>Returns the minimum plot range value of the function with the ID <parameter>id</parameter>. If the function not exists or if the minimum value is not definied, an empty string is returned.</para>
<para>Returns the minimum plot range value of the function with the ID <parameter>id</parameter>. If the function not exists or if the minimum value is not defined, an empty string is returned.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
......@@ -360,7 +361,7 @@
/parser org.kde.kmplot.Parser.functionMaxValue id
</term>
<listitem>
<para>Returns the maximum plot range value of the function with the ID <parameter>id</parameter>. If the function not exists or if the maximum value is not definied, an empty string is returned.</para>
<para>Returns the maximum plot range value of the function with the ID <parameter>id</parameter>. If the function not exists or if the maximum value is not defined, an empty string is returned.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
......@@ -385,7 +386,7 @@
/parser org.kde.kmplot.Parser.functionStartXValue id
</term>
<listitem>
<para>Returns the initial x point for the integral of the function with the ID <parameter>id</parameter>. If the function not exists or if the x-point-expression is not definied, an empty string is returned.</para>
<para>Returns the initial x point for the integral of the function with the ID <parameter>id</parameter>. If the function not exists or if the x-point-expression is not defined, an empty string is returned.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
......@@ -393,7 +394,7 @@
/parser org.kde.kmplot.Parser.functionStartYValue id
</term>
<listitem>
<para>Returns the initial y point for the integral of the function with the ID <parameter>id</parameter>. If the function not exists or if the y-point-expression is not definied, an empty string is returned.</para>
<para>Returns the initial y point for the integral of the function with the ID <parameter>id</parameter>. If the function not exists or if the y-point-expression is not defined, an empty string is returned.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
......@@ -433,4 +434,4 @@
sgml-indent-data:nil
sgml-parent-document:("index.docbook" "BOOK" "CHAPTER")
End:
-->
\ No newline at end of file
-->
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
<para>&kmplot; supports several different types of plots:</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>Explicit cartesians plots of the form y = f(x).</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Explicit cartesian plots of the form y = f(x).</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Parametric plots, where the x and y components are specified as functions of an independent variable.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Polar plots of the form r = r(&thgr;).</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Implicit plots, where the x and y coordinates are related by an expression.</para></listitem>
......
......@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@
<varlistentry>
<term>sign(x)</term>
<listitem><para>The sign of x. Returns 1 if x is postive, 0 if x is zero, or &minus;1 if x is negative.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The sign of x. Returns 1 if x is positive, 0 if x is zero, or &minus;1 if x is negative.</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
......@@ -254,7 +254,8 @@
<sect1 id="func-extension">
<title>Extensions</title>
<para>An extension for a function is specified by entering a semicolon,
followed by the extension, after the function definition. The extension can be entered by using the DBus method parser addFunction. None of the extensions are available for parametric functions but N and D[a,b] work for polar functions too. For example:
followed by the extension, after the function definition. The extension can be entered by using the &DBus; method parser addFunction. None of the extensions are available
for parametric functions but N and D[a,b] work for polar functions too. For example:
<screen>
<userinput>
f(x)=x^2; A1
......@@ -312,7 +313,7 @@
</variablelist>
</para>
<para>
Please note that you can do all of these operations by editing the items in the <guilabel>Derivates</guilabel> tab, the <guilabel>Cusom plot range</guilabel> section and the <guilabel>Parameters</guilabel> section in the <guilabel>Functions</guilabel> sidebar too.
Please note that you can do all of these operations by editing the items in the <guilabel>Derivates</guilabel> tab, the <guilabel>Custom plot range</guilabel> section and the <guilabel>Parameters</guilabel> section in the <guilabel>Functions</guilabel> sidebar too.
</para>
</sect1>
......
......@@ -4,12 +4,12 @@
<para>&kmplot; deals with several different types of functions, which can be written in function form or as an equation:</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>Cartesians plots can either be written as &eg; <quote>y = x^2</quote>, where x has to be used as the variable; or as &eg; <quote>f(a) = a^2</quote>, where the name of the variable is arbitrary.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Cartesian plots can either be written as &eg; <quote>y = x^2</quote>, where x has to be used as the variable; or as &eg; <quote>f(a) = a^2</quote>, where the name of the variable is arbitrary.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Parametric plots are similar to Cartesian plots. The x and y coordinates can be entered as equations in t, &eg; <quote>x = sin(t)</quote>, <quote>y = cos(t)</quote>, or as functions, &eg; <quote>f_x(s) = sin(s)</quote>, <quote>f_y(s) = cos(s)</quote>.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Polar plots are also similar to Cartesian plots. They can be either be entered as an equation in &thgr;, &eg; <quote>r = &thgr;</quote>, or as a function, &eg;
<quote>f(x) = x</quote>.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>For implicit plots, the name of the function is entered separetely from the expression relating the x and y coordinates. If the x and y variables are specified via the function name (by entering &eg;<quote>f(a,b)</quote> as the function name), then these variables will be used. Otherwise, the letters x and y will be used for the variables.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Explicit differential plots are differential equations whereby the highest derivatve is given in terms of the lower derivatives. Differentiation is denoted by a prime ('). In function form, the equation will look like <quote>f''(x) = f' &minus; f</quote>. In equation form, it will look like <quote>y'' = y' &minus; y</quote>. Note that in both cases, the <quote>(x)</quote> part is not added to the lower order differential terms (so you would enter <quote>f'(x) = &minus;f</quote> and not <quote>f'(x) = &minus;f(x)</quote>).</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>For implicit plots, the name of the function is entered separately from the expression relating the x and y coordinates. If the x and y variables are specified via the function name (by entering &eg;<quote>f(a,b)</quote> as the function name), then these variables will be used. Otherwise, the letters x and y will be used for the variables.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Explicit differential plots are differential equations whereby the highest derivative is given in terms of the lower derivatives. Differentiation is denoted by a prime ('). In function form, the equation will look like <quote>f''(x) = f' &minus; f</quote>. In equation form, it will look like <quote>y'' = y' &minus; y</quote>. Note that in both cases, the <quote>(x)</quote> part is not added to the lower order differential terms (so you would enter <quote>f'(x) = &minus;f</quote> and not <quote>f'(x) = &minus;f(x)</quote>).</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
<para>All the equation entry boxes come with a button on the right. Clicking this invokes the advanced <guilabel>Equation Editor</guilabel> dialog, which provides:
......@@ -129,7 +129,7 @@
y<superscript>(n)</superscript> = F(x,y',y'',...,y<superscript>(n&minus;1)</superscript>), where y<superscript>k</superscript> is the k<superscript>th</superscript> derivative of y(x). &kmplot; can only interpret the derivative order as the number of primes following the function name.
To draw a sinusoidal curve, for example, you would use the differential equation
<userinput>y'' = &minus; y</userinput> oder <userinput>f''(x) = −f</userinput>.
<userinput>y'' = &minus; y</userinput> or <userinput>f''(x) = −f</userinput>.
</para>
<para>However, a differential equation on its own isn't enough to determine a plot. Each curve in the diagram is generated by a combination of the differential equation and the initial conditions. You can edit the initial conditions by clicking on the <guilabel>Initial Conditions</guilabel> tab when a differential equation is selected. The number of columns provided for editing the initial conditions is dependent on the order of the differential equation.
......@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@
</menuchoice></term>
<listitem>
<para>Select the minimum and maximum x-values for the graph in the new dialog that appears.
Calulates the integral and draws the area between the graph and the x-axis in the
Calculates the integral and draws the area between the graph and the x-axis in the
selected range in the color of the graph.
</para>
</listitem>
......
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