Commit 27d9cba9 authored by Antoni Bella Pérez's avatar Antoni Bella Pérez 🚵🏻
Browse files

Documentation updates

* Dump date and version numbers
* Delete all entities from keyword tags, and not applicable &package; entity
* Add an icon
* Suitable tags, some punctuation, use more entities and sync with the GUI messages
parent 05a4bf80
Pipeline #48239 failed with stage
in 3 minutes and 57 seconds
<chapter id="getting-started">
<title>Getting Started</title>
<para>When you start &kturtle; you will see something like this:
<para>When you start &kturtle; you will see something like this:</para>
<screenshot>
<screeninfo>Here is a screenshot of &kturtle; when you start it for the first time</screeninfo>
<mediaobject>
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
</textobject>
</mediaobject>
</screenshot>
In this Getting Started guide we assume that the language of the &turtlescript; commands is English. You can change this language with <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guisubmenu>Script Language</guisubmenu></menuchoice>. Be aware that the language you set here for &kturtle; is the one you use to type the &turtlescript; commands, not the language used by &kde; on your computer and used to display the &kturtle; interface and menus.</para>
<para>In this Getting Started guide we assume that the language of the &turtlescript; commands is English. You can change this language with the <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guisubmenu>Script Language</guisubmenu></menuchoice> submenu. Be aware that the language you set here for &kturtle; is the one you use to type the &turtlescript; commands, not the language used by &kde; on your computer and used to display the &kturtle; interface and menus.</para>
<sect1 id="first-steps">
<title>First steps with &turtlescript;: meet the Turtle!</title>
......@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ Type or copy-paste the code to the editor and execute it (using <link linkend="r
<para>That the turtle draws a thin black line.</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>Maybe you got an error message. This could simply mean two things: you could have made a mistake while copying the commands, or you should still set the correct language for the &turtlescript; commands (you can do that by choosing <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guisubmenu>Script Language</guisubmenu></menuchoice>).</para>
<para>Maybe you got an error message. This could simply mean two things: you could have made a mistake while copying the commands, or you should still set the correct language for the &turtlescript; commands (you can do that by choosing the <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guisubmenu>Script Language</guisubmenu></menuchoice> submenu).</para>
</listitem>
</orderedlist>
......@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ turnleft 45
go 40,100
</screen>
Again you can type or copy-paste the code to the editor or open the <filename>arrow</filename> example in the <guimenu>Examples</guimenu> menu and execute it (using <link linkend="run-execute"><menuchoice><guimenu>Run</guimenu><guimenuitem>Run</guimenuitem></menuchoice></link>) to see the result. In the next examples you are expected to know the drill.</para>
Again you can type or copy-paste the code to the editor or open the <filename>arrow</filename> example in the <guimenu>Examples</guimenu> submenu and execute it (using <link linkend="run-execute"><menuchoice><guimenu>Run</guimenu><guimenuitem>Run</guimenuitem></menuchoice></link>) to see the result. In the next examples you are expected to know the drill.</para>
<para>You might have noticed that this second example uses a lot more code. You have also seen a couple of new commands. Here a short explanation of all the new commands:</para>
......
......@@ -154,8 +154,8 @@ penup
<glossentry id="sprite">
<glossterm>sprite</glossterm>
<glossdef><para>A sprite is a small picture that can be moved around the screen. Our beloved turtle, for instance, is a sprite.</para>
<para>Note: with this version of &kturtle; the sprite cannot be changed from a turtle into something else. Future versions of &kturtle; will be able to do this.</para></glossdef>
<glossdef><para>A sprite is a small picture that can be moved around the screen. Our beloved turtle, for instance, is a sprite.
<note><para>With this version of &kturtle; the sprite cannot be changed from a turtle into something else. Future versions of &kturtle; will be able to do this.</para></note></para></glossdef>
</glossentry>
</glosslist>
......
......@@ -61,8 +61,8 @@
<legalnotice>&FDLNotice;</legalnotice>
<date>2016-05-07</date>
<releaseinfo>0.8.1 beta (Applications 16.04)</releaseinfo>
<date>2021-01-20</date>
<releaseinfo>Applications 20.12</releaseinfo>
<abstract>
<para>&kturtle; is an educational programming environment that aims to make learning how to program as easy as possible. To achieve this &kturtle; makes all programming tools available from the user interface. The programming language used is &turtlescript; which allows its commands to be translated.</para>
......@@ -70,14 +70,13 @@
<keywordset>
<keyword>KDE</keyword>
<keyword>&package;</keyword>
<keyword>KTurtle</keyword>
<keyword>education</keyword>
<keyword>language</keyword>
<keyword>native</keyword>
<keyword>programming</keyword>
<keyword>&turtlescript;</keyword>
<keyword>&logo;</keyword>
<keyword>TurtleScript</keyword>
<keyword>Logo</keyword>
<keyword>turtle</keyword>
</keywordset>
......@@ -96,7 +95,7 @@ programming. One of the main features of &turtlescript; is the ability to transl
<title>What is &turtlescript;?</title>
<para>&turtlescript;, the programming language used in &kturtle;, is inspired by the &logo; family of programming languages. The first version of &logo; was created by Seymour Papert of MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in 1967 as an offshoot of the LISP programming language. From then many versions of &logo; have been released. By 1980 &logo; was gaining momentum, with versions for MSX, Commodore, Atari, Apple II and IBM PC systems. These versions were mainly for educational
purposes. The MIT is still maintains <ulink
url="http://el.media.mit.edu/logo-foundation/">a website on &logo;</ulink> containing a list of several popular implementation of the language.</para>
url="https://el.media.mit.edu/logo-foundation/">a website on &logo;</ulink> containing a list of several popular implementation of the language.</para>
<para>&turtlescript; shares a feature found in many other implementations of &logo;: the ability to translate the commands to suit the native language of the student. This feature makes it easier for students that have no or little understanding of English to get started. Besides this feature &kturtle; has <link linkend="features-of-kturtle">many other features</link> aimed at easing the students initial experience with programming.</para>
</sect1>
......@@ -110,7 +109,7 @@ url="http://el.media.mit.edu/logo-foundation/">a website on &logo;</ulink> conta
<listitem><para>&turtlescript; supports user defined functions, recursion and dynamic type switching.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The execution can be slowed down, paused or stopped at any time.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>A powerful <link linkend="the-editor">editor</link> featuring intuitive syntax highlighting, line numbering, error markers, visual execution and more.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The <link linkend="the-canvas">canvas</link>, where the turtle draws, can be printed or saved either as an image (PNG) or a drawing (SVG).</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The <link linkend="the-canvas">canvas</link>, where the turtle draws, can be printed or saved either as an image (PNG) or a drawing (&SVG;).</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Context help: help where you need it. Just press <keysym>F2</keysym> (or see <menuchoice><guimenu>Help</guimenu><guimenuitem>Help on: ...</guimenuitem></menuchoice>) to get help on the piece of code currently under your cursor.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>An error dialog that links the error messages to the mistakes in the program and marks them red.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Simplified programming terminology.</para></listitem>
......@@ -145,7 +144,7 @@ url="http://el.media.mit.edu/logo-foundation/">a website on &logo;</ulink> conta
Cies Breijs <email>cies AT kde DOT nl</email>
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
&Anne-Marie.Mahfouf; <email>annma AT kde DOT org</email>
&Anne-Marie.Mahfouf; &Anne-Marie.Mahfouf.mail;
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Some proofreading changes by &Philip.Rodrigues;
&Philip.Rodrigues.mail;</para>
......
<chapter id="reference">
<title>&turtlescript; Programming Reference</title>
<para>This is the reference for &kturtle;'s &turtlescript;. In the first section of this chapter have a look at some aspects of the <link linkend="grammar">grammar</link> of &turtlescript; programs. The second section deals exclusively with <link linkend="mathematical-operators">mathematical operators</link>, <link linkend="boolean-operators">boolean (true/false) operators</link> and <link linkend="comparing-operators">comparison operators</link>. The third section is basically a giant list of all <link linkend="commands">commands</link> explaining them one-by-one. Section four explains how to <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">assign</link> values to <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">variables</link>. Finally we explain how to arrange the execution of commands with <link linkend="controlling-execution">execution controlling statements</link> in section five and how to create you own commands with <link linkend="learn">learn</link> in section six.</para>
<para>This is the reference for &kturtle;'s &turtlescript;. In the first section of this chapter have a look at some aspects of the <link linkend="grammar">grammar</link> of &turtlescript; programs. The second section deals exclusively with <link linkend="mathematical-operators">mathematical operators</link>, <link linkend="boolean-operators">boolean (true/false) operators</link> and <link linkend="comparing-operators">comparison operators</link>. The third section is basically a giant list of all <link linkend="commands">commands</link> explaining them one-by-one. Section four explains how to <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">assign</link> values to <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">variables</link>. Finally we explain how to arrange the execution of commands with <link linkend="controlling-execution">execution controlling statements</link> in section five and how to create you own commands with <link linkend="learn"><userinput>learn</userinput></link> in section six.</para>
<sect1 id="grammar">
<title>The Grammar of &turtlescript;</title>
......@@ -40,8 +40,8 @@ The first line is a <link linkend="comment">comment</link>. The second line cont
<sect2 id="number">
<title>Numbers</title>
<para>Most likely you already know quite a bit about numbers. The way numbers are used in &kturtle; is not much different from spoken language, or math. </para>
<para>We have the so called natural numbers: <userinput>0</userinput>, <userinput>1</userinput>, <userinput>2</userinput>, <userinput>3</userinput>, <userinput>4</userinput>, <userinput>5</userinput>, etc. The negative numbers: <userinput>-1</userinput>, <userinput>-2</userinput>, <userinput>-3</userinput>, etc. And the numbers with decimals, or dot-numbers, for example: <userinput>0.1</userinput>, <userinput>3.14</userinput>, <userinput>33.3333</userinput>, <userinput>-5.05</userinput>, <userinput>-1.0</userinput>.
<para>Most likely you already know quite a bit about numbers. The way numbers are used in &kturtle; is not much different from spoken language, or math.</para>
<para>We have the so called natural numbers: <userinput>0</userinput>, <userinput>1</userinput>, <userinput>2</userinput>, <userinput>3</userinput>, <userinput>4</userinput>, <userinput>5</userinput>, &etc; The negative numbers: <userinput>-1</userinput>, <userinput>-2</userinput>, <userinput>-3</userinput>, &etc; And the numbers with decimals, or dot-numbers, for example: <userinput>0.1</userinput>, <userinput>3.14</userinput>, <userinput>33.3333</userinput>, <userinput>-5.05</userinput>, <userinput>-1.0</userinput>.
The <userinput>.</userinput> character (dot) is used as decimal separator.
</para>
<para>Numbers can be used in <link linkend="mathematical-operators">mathematical operators</link> and <link linkend="comparing-operators">comparison operators</link>. They can also be stored in <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">variables</link>. Numbers are <glossterm>highlighted</glossterm> in dark red.</para>
......@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ In this example <userinput>print</userinput> is a command where <userinput>"Hell
<sect2 id="boolean-value">
<title>Boolean (true/false) values</title>
<para>There are only two boolean values: <userinput>true</userinput><indexterm><primary>true</primary></indexterm> and <userinput>false</userinput><indexterm><primary>false</primary></indexterm>. Sometimes they are also called: on and off, yes and no, one and zero. But in &turtlescript; we call them, always, <userinput>true</userinput> and <userinput>false</userinput>. Have a look at this piece of &turtlescript;:
<para>There are only two boolean values: <userinput>true</userinput><indexterm><primary>true</primary></indexterm> and <userinput>false</userinput><indexterm><primary>false</primary></indexterm>. Sometimes they are also called: <quote><userinput>on</userinput></quote> and <quote><userinput>off</userinput></quote>, <quote><userinput>yes</userinput></quote> and <quote><userinput>no</userinput></quote>, <quote><userinput>one</userinput></quote> and <quote><userinput>zero</userinput></quote>. But in &turtlescript; we call them, always, <userinput>true</userinput> and <userinput>false</userinput>. Have a look at this piece of &turtlescript;:
<screen>
$a = true
</screen>
......@@ -139,7 +139,7 @@ if (($a &lt; 10) and ($b == 5)) and ($a &lt; $b) {
print "hello"
}
</screen>
In this piece of &turtlescript; the result of three <link linkend="comparing-operators">comparing operators</link> are merged using <userinput>and</userinput> operators. This means that all three have to evaluate "true" in order for the "hello" to be printed.</para>
In this piece of &turtlescript; the result of three <link linkend="comparing-operators">comparing operators</link> are merged using <userinput>and</userinput> operators. This means that all three have to evaluate <quote>true</quote> in order for the <quote>hello</quote> to be printed.</para>
<para>An example with <userinput>or</userinput>:
<screen>
......@@ -148,9 +148,9 @@ if ($n &lt; 10) or ($n == 2) {
print "hello"
}
</screen>
In this piece of &turtlescript; the left side of the <userinput>or</userinput> is evaluating to 'true', the right side to 'false'. Since one of the two sides of the <userinput>or</userinput> operator is 'true', the <userinput>or</userinput> operator evaluates 'true'. That means "hello" gets printed.</para>
In this piece of &turtlescript; the left side of the <userinput>or</userinput> is evaluating to <quote>true</quote>, the right side to <quote>false</quote>. Since one of the two sides of the <userinput>or</userinput> operator is <quote>true</quote>, the <userinput>or</userinput> operator evaluates <quote>true</quote>. That means <quote>hello</quote> gets printed.</para>
<para>And finally an example with <userinput>not</userinput> which changes 'true' into 'false' and 'false' into 'true'. Have a look:
<para>And finally an example with <userinput>not</userinput> which changes <quote>true</quote> into <quote>false</quote> and <quote>false</quote> into <quote>true</quote>. Have a look:
<screen>
$n = 1
if not ($n == 3) {
......@@ -168,7 +168,7 @@ if not ($n == 3) {
<screen>
$answer = 10 &gt; 3
</screen>
Here <userinput>10</userinput> is compared to <userinput>3</userinput> with the 'greater than' operator. The result of this comparison, the <link linkend="boolean-value">boolean value</link> <userinput>true</userinput> is stored in the <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">variable</link> <userinput>$answer</userinput>.</para>
Here <userinput>10</userinput> is compared to <userinput>3</userinput> with the <quote>greater than</quote> operator. The result of this comparison, the <link linkend="boolean-value">boolean value</link> <userinput>true</userinput> is stored in the <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">variable</link> <userinput>$answer</userinput>.</para>
<para>All <link linkend="number">numbers</link> and <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">variables</link> (that contain numbers) can be compared to each other with comparing operators.</para>
<para>
Here are all possible comparing operators:
......@@ -209,7 +209,7 @@ Here are all possible comparing operators:
</tbody>
</tgroup>
</table>
Please note that $A and $B have to be <link linkend="number">numbers</link> or <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">variables</link> that contain numbers.</para>
Please note that <userinput>$A</userinput> and <userinput>$B</userinput> have to be <link linkend="number">numbers</link> or <link linkend="assignment-of-variables">variables</link> that contain numbers.</para>
</sect2>
......@@ -219,7 +219,7 @@ Please note that $A and $B have to be <link linkend="number">numbers</link> or <
<sect1 id="commands">
<title>Commands</title>
<para>Using commands you tell the turtle or &kturtle; to do something. Some commands need input, some give output. In this section we explain all the built-in commands of &kturtle;. Alternatively, using <link linkend="learn">learn</link>, you can create your own commands. Built-in commands we discuss here are <glossterm>highlighted</glossterm> with dark blue.</para>
<para>Using commands you tell the turtle or &kturtle; to do something. Some commands need input, some give output. In this section we explain all the built-in commands of &kturtle;. Alternatively, using <link linkend="learn"><userinput>learn</userinput></link>, you can create your own commands. Built-in commands we discuss here are <glossterm>highlighted</glossterm> with dark blue.</para>
<sect2 id="moving-the-turtle">
<title>Moving the turtle</title>
......@@ -412,9 +412,9 @@ Please note that $A and $B have to be <link linkend="number">numbers</link> or <
<sect2 id="sprites">
<title>The turtle is a sprite</title>
<para>First a brief explanation of what sprites are: sprites are small pictures that can be moved around the screen, like we often see in computer games. Our turtle is also a sprite. For more info see the glossary on <glossterm linkend="sprites">sprites</glossterm>. </para>
<para>First a brief explanation of what sprites are: sprites are small pictures that can be moved around the screen, like we often see in computer games. Our turtle is also a sprite. For more info see the glossary on <glossterm linkend="sprites">sprites</glossterm>.</para>
<para>Next you will find a full overview on all commands to work with sprites.</para>
<para>[The current version of &kturtle; does not yet support the use of sprites other than the turtle. With future versions you will be able to change the turtle into something of your own design]</para>
<note><para>The current version of &kturtle; does not yet support the use of sprites other than the turtle. With future versions you will be able to change the turtle into something of your own design.</para></note>
<variablelist>
<anchor id="spriteshow" />
<varlistentry>
......@@ -672,7 +672,7 @@ repeat 36 {
</sect2>
<sect2 id="if">
<title>Execute "if"</title>
<title>Execute <quote>if</quote></title>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
<term>if<indexterm><primary>if</primary></indexterm></term>
......@@ -690,7 +690,7 @@ if $x &gt; 5 {
</sect2>
<sect2 id="else">
<title>If not, in other words: "else"</title>
<title>If not, in other words: <quote>else</quote></title>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
<term>else<indexterm><primary>else</primary></indexterm></term>
......@@ -711,7 +711,7 @@ if $x &gt; 5 {
</sect2>
<sect2 id="while">
<title>The "while" loop</title>
<title>The <quote>while</quote> loop</title>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
<term>while<indexterm><primary>while</primary></indexterm></term>
......@@ -731,7 +731,7 @@ while $x &lt; 5 {
</sect2>
<sect2 id="repeat">
<title>The "repeat" loop</title>
<title>The <quote>repeat</quote> loop</title>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
<term>repeat<indexterm><primary>repeat</primary></indexterm></term>
......@@ -742,7 +742,7 @@ while $x &lt; 5 {
</sect2>
<sect2 id="for">
<title>The "for" loop, a counting loop</title>
<title>The <quote>for</quote> loop, a counting loop</title>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
<term>for<indexterm><primary>for</primary></indexterm><indexterm><primary>to</primary></indexterm><indexterm><primary>step</primary></indexterm></term>
......
<chapter id="translators">
<title>Translator's Guide to &kturtle;</title>
<para>As you probably already know &kturtle;'s programming language, &turtlescript;, allows to be translated. This takes away a barrier for some, especially younger students, on their effort to understand the basics of programming.</para>
<para>When translating &kturtle; to a new language you will find, in addition to the GUI strings, the programming commands, the examples and the error messages are included in the standard .pot files as used for translation in &kde;. Everything is translated using the regular translation method found in &kde;, yet you are strongly advised to learn a little on how to translate these (as you will also read in the translator comments).</para>
<para>When translating &kturtle; to a new language you will find, in addition to the &GUI; strings, the programming commands, the examples and the error messages are included in the standard <filename class="extension">.pot</filename> files as used for translation in &kde;. Everything is translated using the regular translation method found in &kde;, yet you are strongly advised to learn a little on how to translate these (as you will also read in the translator comments).</para>
<para>Please look at <ulink
url="http://edu.kde.org/kturtle/translator.php">http://edu.kde.org/kturtle/translator.php</ulink> for more information about the translation process. Thanks a lot for your work! KTurtle depends heavily on its translations.</para>
url="https://edu.kde.org/kturtle/translation.php">https://edu.kde.org/kturtle/translation.php</ulink> for more information about the translation process. Thanks a lot for your work! &kturtle; depends heavily on its translations.</para>
</chapter>
......@@ -18,8 +18,8 @@
<sect1 id="the-editor">
<title>The Editor</title>
<para>In the editor you type the &turtlescript; commands. Most of functions of the editor can be found in the <link linkend="the-file-menu">File</link> and <link linkend="the-edit-menu">Edit</link> menus. The editor can be docked on each border of the main window or it can be detached and placed anywhere on your desktop.</para>
<para>You have several ways to get some code in the editor. The easiest way is to use an example: choose <menuchoice><guimenu>File</guimenu><guisubmenu>Examples</guisubmenu></menuchoice> in the <link linkend="the-file-menu">File menu</link> and select an example. The file example you choose will be opened in the <link linkend="the-editor">the editor</link>, you can then use <menuchoice><guimenu>Run</guimenu><guimenuitem>Run</guimenuitem></menuchoice> from the menubar or the <guibutton>Run</guibutton> from the toolbar to run the code if you like.</para>
<para>You can open &turtlescript; files by choosing <menuchoice><guimenu>File</guimenu><guimenuitem>Open...</guimenuitem></menuchoice>.</para>
<para>You have several ways to get some code in the editor. The easiest way is to use an example: choose the <menuchoice><guimenu>File</guimenu><guisubmenu>Examples</guisubmenu></menuchoice> submenu and select an example. The file example you choose will be opened in the <link linkend="the-editor">the editor</link>, you can then use the <menuchoice><guimenu>Run</guimenu><guimenuitem>Run</guimenuitem></menuchoice> menu item (shortcut: <keycombo action="simul">&Alt;<keycap>F2</keycap></keycombo>) or the <inlinemediaobject> <imageobject> <imagedata fileref="media-playback-pause.png" format="PNG"/> </imageobject> </inlinemediaobject> <guibutton>Run</guibutton> button from the toolbar to run the code if you like.</para>
<para>You can open &turtlescript; files by choosing the <menuchoice><guimenu>File</guimenu><guimenuitem>Open...</guimenuitem></menuchoice> menu item.</para>
<para>The third way is to directly type your own code in the editor or to copy/paste some code.</para>
</sect1>
......@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@
<sect1 id="the-toolbar">
<title>The Toolbar</title>
<para>Here you can quickly reach the most used actions. The Toolbar also contains the <guilabel>Console</guilabel> where you can quickly invoke commands, this might be useful in case you want to test a command without modifying the content of the <link linkend="the-editor">Editor</link>.</para>
<para>Here you can quickly reach the most used actions. The Toolbar also contains the <guilabel>Console:</guilabel> input box, where you can quickly invoke commands, this might be useful in case you want to test a command without modifying the content of the <link linkend="the-editor">Editor</link>.</para>
<para>You can configure the toolbar using <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guimenuitem>Configure Toolbars...</guimenuitem></menuchoice> to better fit your preferences.</para>
</sect1>
......@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@
<guimenu>File</guimenu>
<guisubmenu>Examples</guisubmenu>
</menuchoice></term>
<listitem><para>Open example &turtlescript; programs. The examples are in your favorite language that you can choose in <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guisubmenu>Script Language</guisubmenu></menuchoice>.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Open example &turtlescript; programs. The examples are in your favorite language that you can choose in the <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guisubmenu>Script Language</guisubmenu></menuchoice> submenu.</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
<variablelist>
......@@ -105,7 +105,7 @@
<guimenu>File</guimenu>
<guimenuitem>Get more examples...</guimenuitem>
</menuchoice></term>
<listitem><para>Open the get <guilabel>Hot New Stuff</guilabel> dialog to download
<listitem><para>Open the <guilabel>Get Hot New Stuff</guilabel> dialog to download
additional &turtlescript; files from the Internet.</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
......@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@
<guimenu>File</guimenu>
<guimenuitem>Export to HTML...</guimenuitem>
</menuchoice></term>
<listitem><para>Exports the current content of the Editor as an HTML file that includes highlighting colors.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Exports the current content of the Editor as an &HTML; file that includes highlighting colors.</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
<variablelist>
......@@ -311,7 +311,7 @@
<varlistentry>
<term><menuchoice>
<shortcut>
<keycombo><keycap>Ins</keycap></keycombo>
<keycombo>&Ins;</keycombo>
</shortcut>
<guimenu>Edit</guimenu>
<guimenuitem>Overwrite Mode</guimenuitem>
......@@ -341,7 +341,7 @@
<guimenu>Canvas</guimenu>
<guimenuitem>Export to Drawing (SVG)...</guimenuitem>
</menuchoice></term>
<listitem><para>Exports the current content of the <link linkend="the-canvas">Canvas</link> as a vector drawing of the SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) type.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Exports the current content of the <link linkend="the-canvas">Canvas</link> as a vector drawing of the &SVG; (Scalable Vector Graphics) type.</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
<variablelist>
......@@ -477,7 +477,7 @@
<guimenu>Settings</guimenu>
<guimenuitem>Show Errors</guimenuitem>
</menuchoice></term>
<listitem><para>Show or hide the <guilabel>Error</guilabel> tab with a list of errors resulting from running the code. If this option is enabled, click on <guilabel>Canvas</guilabel> to see the turtle again.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Show or hide the <guilabel>Errors</guilabel> tab with a list of errors resulting from running the code. If this option is enabled, click on <guilabel>Canvas</guilabel> to see the turtle again.</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
<variablelist>
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment