Commit 56f6d4e2 authored by Yuri Chornoivan's avatar Yuri Chornoivan
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Document rules for the new games (patch by Ian Wadham, with minor corrections)

parent 7f0c00f8
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</copyright>
<legalnotice>&FDLNotice;</legalnotice>
<date>2013-12-18</date><!-- Date of (re)writing, or update.-->
<releaseinfo>1.2.1 (&kde; 4.12)</releaseinfo><!-- Application version number. Use the variable definitions within header to change this value.-->
<date>2020-05-21</date><!-- Date of (re)writing, or update.-->
<releaseinfo>1.4.200400</releaseinfo><!-- Application version number. Use the variable definitions within header to change this value.-->
<!--Short description of this document. Do not change unless necessary!-->
<abstract>
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symbol. In &kappname; the symbols are usually the numbers 1 to 9,
but may be the letters A to P or A to Y in larger puzzles. Puzzles
start with the board partially filled and it is your job to fill
in the rest.</para>
in the rest. Some types of puzzle have less than nine symbols.</para>
<para>When you start a game, you can choose from several Sudoku types
and sizes. You can then have &kappname; generate a puzzle for
......@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@
&kappname; to check it and maybe solve it.</para>
<para>There are many variations of Sudoku in existence and &kappname;
provides a good selection of them. The most common variant has
provides a good selection of them. The most common type, Standard Sudoku, has
a 9x9 square grid and uses Arabic numerals 1 to 9 as symbols. The
grid has 9 rows and 9 columns and is divided into 9 blocks of
3x3 squares. The problem is – each symbol can only be used once
......@@ -197,7 +197,9 @@
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>Knowledge of mathematics or language is not required
to solve &kappname; puzzles.</para></listitem>
to solve &kappname; puzzles, but a little ability with
arithmetic is needed in Killer Sudoku and Mathdoku
puzzles.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The symbols already on the game board when the
puzzle starts cannot be changed.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>You can only modify the symbols you have previously
......@@ -213,19 +215,59 @@
<sect1 id="variants"><title>&kappname; Variations</title>
<sect2 id="standard_sudoku"><title>Sudoku Puzzles</title>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>The Standard 9x9 Sudoku puzzle has 9 rows, 9 columns
and 9 square blocks of size 3x3.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Other sizes of Standard Sudoku are 4x4 (very easy),
16x16 and 25x25 (not so easy).</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Jigsaw variation is the same as Standard Sudoku
except that some blocks are not square.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Jigsaw and Aztec variations are the same as
Standard 9x9 Sudoku except that some blocks are not square.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The XSudoku variation is exactly the same as Standard
Sudoku with an additional requirement: the two main
diagonals must also each contain the symbols 1 to 9 once
and once only. &kappname; highlights the diagonals to make
this easier to see.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Roxdoku variations are based on cubes in three
<listitem><para>The Nonomino 9x9, Pentomino 5x5 and Tetromino 4x4
variations are the same as a Standard Sudoku
except that some blocks are not square.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The 6x6 variation is the same as a Standard Sudoku
except that the blocks are
six 3x2 rectangles.</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="samurai"><title>Samurai Puzzles</title>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>The Samurai Sudoku consists of five Standard Sudoku
puzzles of 9x9 squares each, overlapping at the corners
by four 3x3 blocks. Each of the five puzzles has 9 rows,
9 columns and 9 blocks to solve and the symbols in the
overlapping squares must fit into the solutions of two
Standard 9x9 Sudokus.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Tiny Samurai Sudoku contains five 4x4 Sudoku
puzzles, overlapping at the corners by four squares. Each
of the five puzzles has 4 rows, 4 columns and 4 blocks to
solve.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Windmill variation consists of five Standard 9x9
Sudoku puzzles, overlapping at the corners by two 3x3 blocks.
It is like a Samurai Sudoku, but the central 9x9 Sudoku is
harder to see. Eight of its 3x3 blocks are shared with the
sails of the windmill and only the central 3x3 block is not.
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Sohei variation is another Samurai type and has
four 9x9 Sudoku puzzles, overlapping at two corners by a
3x3 block. the central 3x3 block of the puzzle is empty.
</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="roxdoku"><title>Roxdoku 3D Puzzles</title>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>The Roxdoku variants are based on cubes in three
dimensions, but are easier than they sound. There are no
rows or columns. A 3x3x3 Roxdoku puzzle has 27 small cubes
arranged into a larger 3x3x3 cube. This contains nine
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the square blocks that must be filled with the numbers
1 to 9. A 4x4x4 Roxdoku has twelve 4x4 slices and a
5x5x5 Roxdoku has fifteen 5x5 slices.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Samurai Sudoku consists of five Standard Sudoku
puzzles of 9x9 squares each, overlapping at the corners
by four 3x3 blocks. Each of the five puzzles has 9 rows
and 9 columns to solve, but there are only 41 blocks to
solve, rather than 45, because of the overlap.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Tiny Samurai Sudoku consists of five 4x4
puzzles, overlapping at the corners by four squares. Each
of the five puzzles has 4 rows, 4 columns and 4 blocks to
solve.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Roxdoku Twin variant has two 3x3x3 Roxdoku
puzzles sharing a corner. The corner piece must be part of
the solution of both 3x3x3 cubes.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Double Roxdoku variant contains two 3x3x3
Roxdoku puzzles sharing three pieces along an edge. The
edge pieces must be part of the solution of both 3x3x3 cubes.
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>The Samurai Roxdoku variant has nine 3x3x3 Roxdoku
puzzles. One is at the center and the other eight 3x3x3
cubes overlap it, one at each of the central cube's corners.
Those corner pieces must each be part of the solution of
two 3x3x3 cubes.</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="killer"><title>Killer and Mathdoku Variations</title>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>Killer puzzles have two variants: Tiny Killer
(4x4) and Killer Sudoku (9x9). They both have rows, columns
and square blocks, exactly as in Standard Sudoku puzzles
and following exactly the same rules. They also have
irregularly shaped areas called cages, where each cage's
digits must add up to the number in small type in the
corner of the cage and no digit can be repeated within
the cage. Typically the puzzle starts with only a few
squares containing symbols. You need to use arithmetic
and the usual Sudoku rules together to work out the
solution. The screen graphics make it difficult to
visualize the square blocks that are present, but they
are easier to see if you print the puzzle, using the
<menuchoice><guimenu>Game</guimenu>
<guimenuitem>Print...</guimenuitem></menuchoice>
menu item.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Mathdoku variants, also known as
<trademark>Kenken</trademark>, have no blocks, only row and
column restrictions, and have cages where the digits
must add, subtract, divide or multiply according to the
values and arithmetical symbols in small type in their
corners. A digit in a Mathdoku cage can be repeated,
but not in the same column or row. For example, an
L-shape of three squares with a requirement 5+ can have
solutions 1 3 1 or 2 1 2, provided the ones or twos are
not in the same row or column as each other. Note that
subtraction and division cages always have two squares
and the two digits of the solution can appear in either
order. For example, a 2-cage could have solutions 1 3
or 3 1 or 2 4 or 4 2, &etc;</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>Because there are no blocks in a Mathdoku puzzle,
it can have any size from 3x3 up to 9x9, with the default
being 6x6. See the
<link linkend="configuration">Game Configuration</link>
section for details. To get you started, there is
a variant called Mathdoku 101 of size 4x4.</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</sect2>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="tips"><title>Strategies and Tips</title>
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<term><guilabel>Show Highlights in 3-D puzzles</guilabel></term>
<listitem><para>Toggle the &kappname; highlight option for three-dimensional puzzles.</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term><guilabel>Mathdoku puzzle size (3-9)</guilabel></term>
<listitem><para>Choose a size for Mathdoku puzzles, from 3 (very easy) to 9 (very hard) with size 6 being the default.</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term><guilabel>Settings for 3-D Puzzles Only</guilabel></term>
<listitem><para>These five settings adjust the highlighting and visibility of cells in three-dimensional puzzles. The idea is to make it easier to see relationships between cells, especially if they are behind other cells.</para></listitem>
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<email>ksudoku@kappenburg.net</email>,
Eugene Trounev <email>eugene.trounev@gmail.com</email></para>
<para>Documentation copyright 2011 Ian Wadham
<para>Documentation copyright 2011-2020 Ian Wadham
<email>iandw.au@gmail.com</email></para>
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