Commit ed04e811 authored by Andreas Eliasson's avatar Andreas Eliasson
Browse files

Doc: Fix typos



Fix typos, remove excessive whitespace, and fix punctuation.

Fixes: QTBUG-107483
Pick-to: 6.4 6.2
Change-Id: Ib6702957a93bff8af9a7d5a4ea2fc958ca81196d
Reviewed-by: default avatarTopi Reiniö <topi.reinio@qt.io>
parent 3d53b994
......@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@ Arguments:
form) and the included shaders.
\li Extraction mode. This allows writing a given shader from an
existing \c{.qsb} file into a separate file. For examples, \c{qsb
existing \c{.qsb} file into a separate file. For example, \c{qsb
-x spirv.100 -o myshader.spv myshader.frag.qsb} writes the SPIR-V
binary into \c myshader.spv.
......@@ -177,7 +177,7 @@ Binary of 864 bytes
\endcode
This leads to generating a shader package that makes it suitable for OpenGL,
Direct 3D, and Metal as well. The features used in this shader are basic,
Direct 3D, and Metal as well. The features used in this shader are basic,
and even GLSL ES 100 (the shading language of OpenGL ES 2.0) is suitable.
Inspecting the result shows:
......@@ -323,12 +323,12 @@ Native resource binding map:
1 -> [0, 0]
\endcode
Internally this allows mapping a SPIR-V style binding point \c 0 to the HLSL
register \c b0 and binding \c 1 to \c t0 and \c s0. This helps making the
differences in resource bindings between the various shading languages
Internally, this allows mapping a SPIR-V style binding point \c 0 to the
HLSL register \c b0 and binding \c 1 to \c t0 and \c s0. This helps making
the differences in resource bindings between the various shading languages
transparent to the users of the Rendering Hardware Interface, and allows
everything in Qt to operate with Vulkan/SPIR-V style binding points as
they are specified in the original Vulkan-style GLSL source code.
everything in Qt to operate with Vulkan/SPIR-V style binding points as they
are specified in the original Vulkan-style GLSL source code.
\section1 Shader Types
......@@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ Native resource binding map:
of version 3.2 and higher.
If the shader uses functions or constructs that do not have an equivalent in
the specified targets, \c qsb will fail. If that is the case, the targets
the specified targets, \c qsb will fail. If that is the case, the targets
will need to be adjusted, and this also means that the application's minimum
system requirements get adjusted implicitly. As an example, take the \c
textureLod GLSL function that is only available with OpenGL ES 3.0 and up
......@@ -367,7 +367,7 @@ Native resource binding map:
file will now require OpenGL ES 3.0 or higher and will not be compatible
with OpenGL ES 2.0 based systems.
Another obvious example of this are compute shaders: \c{.comp} shaders will
Another obvious example of this is compute shaders: \c{.comp} shaders will
need to specify \c{--glsl 310es,430} as compute shaders are only available
with OpenGL ES 3.1 or newer and OpenGL 4.3 or newer.
......@@ -384,8 +384,8 @@ Native resource binding map:
supplied GLSL vertex shader code. In Qt 6 that is not an option. Instead,
batchable variants of vertex shaders can be built by the \c qsb tool. This
is requested by the \c{-b} argument. When the input is not a vertex shader
with \c{.vert} extension, it has no effect. For vertex shaders however, it
will lead to generating to versions for each target. Qt Quick will then
with \c{.vert} extension, it has no effect. For vertex shaders, however, it
will lead to generating two versions for each target. Qt Quick will then
automatically pick the right variant (standard or batchable) at run time.
\note Applications do not have to concern themselves with the details of
......@@ -452,10 +452,10 @@ Reflection info: {
stored in the \c{.qsb} file instead of HLSL. Qt will automatically pick it
up at run time, so it is up to the \c{.qsb} file's creator to decide what to
include, HLSL source or the intermediate format. Whenever possible, prefer
the latter since it eliminates the need for parsing and HLSL source at run
the latter since it eliminates the need for parsing an HLSL source at run
time, leading to potentially significant performance gains upon graphics
pipeline creation. The downside is that this argument can only be used when
\c qsb is being run on Windows.
\c qsb runs on Windows.
\li \c{-t} or \c{--metallib} - invokves the appropriate XCode Metal tools to
generate a .metallib file and includes that in the \c{.qsb} package instead
......@@ -554,7 +554,7 @@ void main()
Let's call this \c{shader_gles.frag}. Once \c{qsb --glsl 100es -o
shader.frag.qsb shader.frag} completes, giving us a (half-ready) .qsb file,
we can do \c{qsb -r glsl,100es,shader_gles.frag shader.frag.qsb} to update
update \c{shader.frag.qsb} by substituting the shader for GLSL 100 es with
\c{shader.frag.qsb} by substituting the shader for GLSL 100 es with
the contents of the specified file (\c{shader_gles.frag}). Now
\c{shader.frag.qsb} is ready to be used at run time with OpenGL ES.
......
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