Commit 6ccf6852 authored by Yuri Chornoivan's avatar Yuri Chornoivan Committed by Wolthera van Hövell

Fix typos, formatting, American English

Summary: Fix typos, use :guilabel:, ise -> ize

Test Plan: none

Reviewers: #krita_manual, woltherav

Reviewed By: #krita_manual, woltherav

Tags: #krita_manual

Differential Revision: https://phabricator.kde.org/D20517
parent dc148a95
......@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ With glazing can get you pretty far when it comes to *defining planes and forms*
Off-Canvas Mixing
-----------------
**Off-canvas** mixing has basically always been a core tool for artists everywhere; when we think of the stereotypical artist we might imagine someone with a few **brushes** in one hand and a wooden **palette** in the other. Whether it's oils, watercolor, or other traditional media, for the artist to have absolute control over their colors it's crucial to have some kind of palette, plate, jar, or other **off-canvas area** to mix colors together. While it's easy to overlook this in digital painting (where selecting fresh new colors without mixing at all is both easy and free*), Krita has a few very useful and unique features for off-canvas mixing.
**Off-canvas** mixing has basically always been a core tool for artists everywhere; when we think of the stereotypical artist we might imagine someone with a few **brushes** in one hand and a wooden **palette** in the other. Whether it's oils, watercolor, or other traditional media, for the artist to have absolute control over their colors it's crucial to have some kind of palette, plate, jar, or other **off-canvas area** to mix colors together. While it's easy to overlook this in digital painting (where selecting fresh new colors without mixing at all is both easy and free), Krita has a few very useful and unique features for off-canvas mixing.
Color Picker Blending
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
......@@ -116,15 +116,15 @@ And still, there is more to this little tool than meets the eye! Not only can yo
The Color Picker Blending feature changes the way that picking colors has traditionally worked for decades; instead of completely replacing your current brush color with the newly sampled color, *blending allows you to quickly "soak up" some portion of the sampled color*, which is then mixed with your current brush color.
You can use Color Picker Blending much like a physical paint brush in traditional media. If you were to dip your paint brush into a pool of *blue* paint, and then immediately dip again into a pool of *red* paint and paint a stoke across your canvas, the stoke wouldn't be pure red - it would be some combination of blue and red which would mix to create an intermediate purple color. Which shade of purple would depend on the ratio of paints that mix together within the hairs of your brush, and this is essentially what the Color Picker's "blend" option controls: what percentage of sampled color is mixed together with your current brush color!
You can use Color Picker Blending much like a physical paint brush in traditional media. If you were to dip your paint brush into a pool of *blue* paint, and then immediately dip again into a pool of *red* paint and paint a stroke across your canvas, the stoke wouldn't be pure red - it would be some combination of blue and red which would mix to create an intermediate purple color. Which shade of purple would depend on the ratio of paints that mix together within the hairs of your brush, and this is essentially what the Color Picker's "blend" option controls: what percentage of sampled color is mixed together with your current brush color!
Not only does Krita's Color Picker Blending feel even more like mixing paints, it is also completely off-canvas and independent of opacity, flow, shape, and other brush settings. Furthermore, unlike most on-canvas mixing techniques, Color Picker Blending works regardless of the location of colors on your canvas - enabling your to mix with colors at any position, on any layer, or even in different documents! Quickly mix lighting colors with local colors, mix the ambient sky color into shadows, create atmospheric depth, mix from a preselected palette of colors in another layer/document, etc.
Not only does Krita's Color Picker Blending feel even more like mixing paints, it is also completely off-canvas and independent of opacity, flow, shape, and other brush settings. Furthermore, unlike most on-canvas mixing techniques, Color Picker Blending works regardless of the location of colors on your canvas - enabling you to mix with colors at any position, on any layer, or even in different documents! Quickly mix lighting colors with local colors, mix the ambient sky color into shadows, create atmospheric depth, mix from a preselected palette of colors in another layer/document, etc.
To use Color Picker Blending, simply set the "blend" option in the **Tool Options Docker** while the Color Picker Tool is active; setting blend to 100% will cause your Color Picker to work in the traditional way (completely replacing your brush color with the picked color), setting to around 50% will give you a half-way mix between colors, and setting to a lower value will create more subtle shifts in colors each click. Of course, blending affects both your dedicated Color Picker Tool as well as the :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| shortcut.
.. note::
Clicking and dragging the Color Picker around the canvas currently causes it to sample many times as it switches pixels. You can use this trait to quickly soak up more color by "dipping" your color picker into a color and swirling it around. This can be pretty satisfying! However, this also means that some care must be taken to prevent from accidentally picking up more color than you want. It's pretty easy to click a single pixel only one time using a **mouse**, but when painting with a **drawing tablet and pen** it can sometimes be desirable to use a slightly lower blend setting!
Clicking and dragging the Color Picker around the canvas currently causes it to sample many times as it switches pixels. You can use this trait to quickly soak up more color by "dipping" your color picker into color and swirling it around. This can be pretty satisfying! However, this also means that some care must be taken to prevent from accidentally picking up more color than you want. It's pretty easy to click a single pixel only one time using a **mouse**, but when painting with a **drawing tablet and pen** it can sometimes be desirable to use a slightly lower blend setting!
The Digital Colors Mixer
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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......@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ Previously referred to as HDR painting and Scene Referred painting, Scene Linear
These are the two important characteristics. The colorspace has a few more properties than this, such as the white point, or more importantly, the colorants that make up the gamut. But here’s the thing, those two could be anything, as long as the space is linear and the color depth is floating point.
So, *Scene Linear is not a single one colorspace, but a **TYPE** of colorspace*. You can have a scene linear space that uses the sRGB/rec 709 colorants, or one that uses adobeRGB, or maybe one that uses rec 2020, as long as it is *linear* and in a *floating point bit depth*.
So, *Scene Linear is not a single one colorspace, but a* **TYPE** *of colorspace*. You can have a scene linear space that uses the sRGB/rec 709 colorants, or one that uses adobeRGB, or maybe one that uses rec 2020, as long as it is *linear* and in a *floating point bit depth*.
These two factors are for one reason: To make black and white arbitrary values. This might seem a bit weird. But when you are dealing with light-sources, you are dealing with a massive range of contrasts, and will have to decide afterwards which white and black you’d like to have. This is what the scene means in scene-linear, the relevant values are unique per scene, like a real world scene: a flowerfield lit by moonlight, a city in twilight or a sunny beach. You want to be able to put the right emphasis on the most important contrasting values, and being able to choose what is white and what is black is a very powerful tool here. After all, humans in the real world can see much more when they get used to the dark, or to the sun, so why not apply that to how we make our images?
......@@ -29,13 +29,13 @@ This is also why it needs to be Linear. Gamma and Tone-mapped color spaces are a
In fact, there’s always a non-destructive sort of transform going on while you are working on your image which includes the tone-mapping. This is called a display or view transform, and they provide a sort of set of binoculars into the world of your image. Without it, your computer cannot show these colors properly; it doesn’t know how to interpret it properly, often making the image too dark. Providing such a transform and allowing you to configure it is the prime function of color management.
Between different view and display transforms, there’s also a difference in types. Some are really naive, others are more sophisticated, and some need to be used in a certain manner to work properly. The ICC color management can only give a certain type of view transforms, while OCIO color management in the lut docker can give much more complex transforms easily configurable and custom settings that can be shared between programs.
Between different view and display transforms, there’s also a difference in types. Some are really naive, others are more sophisticated, and some need to be used in a certain manner to work properly. The ICC color management can only give a certain type of view transforms, while OCIO color management in the LUT docker can give much more complex transforms easily configurable and custom settings that can be shared between programs.
.. figure:: /images/en/color_category/Krita_scenelinear_cat_01.png
:figwidth: 800
:align: center
Above, an example of the more naive transform provided by going from scene-linear sRGB to regular sRGB, and to the right a more sophisticated transform coming from the filmic blender ocio configuration. Look at the difference between the paws. Image by Wolthera van Hövell tot Westerflier, License: CC-BY-SA
Above, an example of the more naive transform provided by going from scene-linear sRGB to regular sRGB, and to the right a more sophisticated transform coming from the filmic blender OCIO configuration. Look at the difference between the paws. Image by Wolthera van Hövell tot Westerflier, License: CC-BY-SA
Conversely, transforming and interpreting your image’s colors is the only thing OCIO can do, and it can do it with really complex transforms, really fast. It doesn’t understand what your image’s color space is originally, doesn’t understand what CMYK is, and there’s also no such thing as a OCIO color profile. Therefore you will need to switch to an ICC workflow if you wish to prepare for print.
......@@ -101,7 +101,7 @@ Overall, this is something that will take a little while getting used to, but yo
Finally, there’s the **issue of size**.
16 bit float per channel images are big. 32 bit float per channel images are bigger. This means that they will eat RAM and that painting and filtering will be slower. This is something that will fix itself over the years, but not many people have such a high-end pc yet, so it can be a blocker.
16 bit float per channel images are big. 32 bit float per channel images are bigger. This means that they will eat RAM and that painting and filtering will be slower. This is something that will fix itself over the years, but not many people have such a high-end PC yet, so it can be a blocker.
So the issues are tools, expectations and size.
......@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ In Summary
Scene Linear Painting is painting an image in a color space that is linear and has a floating point bit depth. This does not assume anything about the values of black and white, so you can only use tools that don’t assume anything about the values of black and white. It has the advantage of having nicer filter results and better color mixtures as well as better interoperability with other scene-linear output.
To be able to view such an image you use a view transform, also called a display conversion. Which means that if you wish to finalise your image for the web, you make a copy of the image that goes through a display conversion or view transform that then gets saved to png or jpeg or tiff.
To be able to view such an image you use a view transform, also called a display conversion. Which means that if you wish to finalize your image for the web, you make a copy of the image that goes through a display conversion or view transform that then gets saved to png or jpeg or tiff.
Getting to actual painting
--------------------------
......@@ -159,6 +159,6 @@ The keen minded will notice that a lighting based workflow kind of resembles the
Finishing up
~~~~~~~~~~~~
When you are done, you will want to apply the view transform you have been using to the image (at the least, if you want to post the end result on the internet)... This is called LUT baking and not possible yet in Krita. Therefore you will have to save out your image in EXR and open it in either Blender or Natron. Then, in Blender it is enough to just use the same ocio config, select the right values and save the result as a png.
When you are done, you will want to apply the view transform you have been using to the image (at the least, if you want to post the end result on the internet)... This is called LUT baking and not possible yet in Krita. Therefore you will have to save out your image in EXR and open it in either Blender or Natron. Then, in Blender it is enough to just use the same OCIO config, select the right values and save the result as a png.
You can even use some of Blender’s or Natron’s filters at this stage, and when working with others, you would save out in EXR so that others can use those.
......@@ -90,4 +90,4 @@ However, when we start projecting, the lights of the room aren't dimmed, which m
In both cases, you can use Krita's color management a little to help you, but mostly, you just need to be ''aware'' of it, as Krita can hardly fix that you are looking at colors at night, or the fact that the presentation hall owner refuses to turn off the lights.
That said, unless you have a display profile that uses LUTs, such as an OCIO lut or a cLUT icc profile, white point won't matter much when choosing a working space, due to weirdness in the icc v4 workflow which always converts matrix profiles with relative colorimetric, meaning the white points are matched up.
That said, unless you have a display profile that uses LUTs, such as an OCIO LUT or a cLUT icc profile, white point won't matter much when choosing a working space, due to weirdness in the icc v4 workflow which always converts matrix profiles with relative colorimetric, meaning the white points are matched up.
......@@ -140,9 +140,9 @@ As you can see, this version both looks more 3d as well as more creepy.
That's because there are less steps involved as the previous version -- We're deriving our image directly from the orthographic view -- so there are less errors involved.
The creepiness is because we've had the tiniest bit of stylisation in our side view, so the eyes come out HUGE. This is because when we stylise the side view of an eye, we tend to draw it not perfectly from the side, but rather slightly at an angle. If you look carefully at the turntable, the same problem crops up there as well.
The creepiness is because we've had the tiniest bit of stylisation in our side view, so the eyes come out HUGE. This is because when we stylize the side view of an eye, we tend to draw it not perfectly from the side, but rather slightly at an angle. If you look carefully at the turntable, the same problem crops up there as well.
Generally, stylised stuff tends to fall apart in 3d view, and you might need to make some choices on how to make it work.
Generally, stylized stuff tends to fall apart in 3d view, and you might need to make some choices on how to make it work.
For example, we can just easily fix the side view (because we used transform masks, this is easy.)
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......@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ Animation Curves Docker
The Animation Curve docker allows you to edit tweened sections by means of interpolation curves. As of this time of writing, it can only edit opacity.
The idea is that sometimes what you want to animate can be expressed as a value. This allows the computer to do maths on the values, and automate tasks, like interpolation, also known as 'Tweening'. Because these are values, like percentage opacity, and animation happens over time, that means we can visualise the way the values are interpolated as a curve graph, and also edit the graph that way.
The idea is that sometimes what you want to animate can be expressed as a value. This allows the computer to do maths on the values, and automate tasks, like interpolation, also known as 'Tweening'. Because these are values, like percentage opacity, and animation happens over time, that means we can visualize the way the values are interpolated as a curve graph, and also edit the graph that way.
But, when you first open this docker, there's no curves visible!
You will first need to add opacity keyframes to the active animation layer. You can do this by using the animation docker and selection :guilabel:`Add new keyframe`.
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......@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
Filters
=======
Filters are little scripts or operations you can run on your drawing. You can visualise them as real-world camera filters that can make a photo darker or blurrier. Or perhaps like a coffee filter, where only water and coffee gets through, and the ground coffee stays behind.
Filters are little scripts or operations you can run on your drawing. You can visualize them as real-world camera filters that can make a photo darker or blurrier. Or perhaps like a coffee filter, where only water and coffee gets through, and the ground coffee stays behind.
Filters are unique to digital painting in terms of complexity, and their part of the painting pipeline. Some artists only use filters to adjust their colors a little. Others, using Filter Layers and Filter Masks use them to dynamically update a part of an image to be filtered. This way, they can keep the original underneath without changing the original image. This is a part of a technique called 'non-destructive' editing.
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......@@ -24,4 +24,4 @@ When you select it, it will ask for the amount of wavelet scales. More scales, m
.. image:: /images/en/Wavelet_decompose.png
:align: center
Adjust a given layer with middle gray to neutralise it, and merge everything with the :guilabel:`Grain Merge` blending mode to merge it into the end image properly.
Adjust a given layer with middle gray to neutralize it, and merge everything with the :guilabel:`Grain Merge` blending mode to merge it into the end image properly.
......@@ -102,7 +102,7 @@ Add a layer underneath your line art layer and start painting with the brush. If
Filling with Flood Fill tool
""""""""""""""""""""""""""""
The second method is to use the Flood fill tool to fill large parts of your line art quickly. This method generally requires closed gaps in the line art. To begin with this method place your line art on a separate layer. Then activate the flood fill tool and set the grow selection to 2px, uncheck limit to current layer if previously checked.
The second method is to use the Flood fill tool to fill large parts of your line art quickly. This method generally requires closed gaps in the line art. To begin with this method place your line art on a separate layer. Then activate the flood fill tool and set the :guilabel:`Grow selection` to 2px, uncheck :guilabel:`Limit to current layer` if previously checked.
.. image:: /images/en/common-workflows/Floodfill-krita.png
:alt: flood fill in krita
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......@@ -58,17 +58,17 @@ Multiply is not a perfect solution however. For example, if through some image e
This is because multiply literally multiplies the colors. So it uses maths!
What it first does is take the values of the RGB channels, then divides them by the max (because we're in 8bit, this is 255), a process we call normalising. Then it multiplies the normalised values. Finally, it takes the result and multiplies it with 255 again to get the result values.
What it first does is take the values of the RGB channels, then divides them by the max (because we're in 8bit, this is 255), a process we call normalising. Then it multiplies the normalized values. Finally, it takes the result and multiplies it with 255 again to get the result values.
.. list-table::
:header-rows: 1
* -
- Pink
- Pink (normalised)
- Pink (normalized)
- Blue
- Blue (normalised)
- Normalised, multiplied
- Blue (normalized)
- Normalized, multiplied
- Result
* - Red
- 222
......@@ -284,7 +284,7 @@ Fiddly details aren’t easy to fill in with this. So I recommend skipping those
Colorize Mask
-------------
So, this is a bit of an odd one. In the original tutorial, you'll see I'm suggesting using G'Mic, but that was a few years ago, and g'mic is a little unstable on windows. Therefore, the Krita developers have been attempting to make an internal tool doing the same.
So, this is a bit of an odd one. In the original tutorial, you'll see I'm suggesting using G'Mic, but that was a few years ago, and G'Mic is a little unstable on windows. Therefore, the Krita developers have been attempting to make an internal tool doing the same.
It is disabled in 3.1, but if you use 4.0 or later, it is in the toolbox. Check the Colorize Mask for more information.
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......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
Inking
======
The first thing to realise about inking is that unlike anatomy, perspective, composition or color theory, you cannot compensate for lack of practice with study or reasoning. This is because all the magic in drawing lines happens from your shoulder to your fingers, very little of it happens in your head, and your lines improve with practice.
The first thing to realize about inking is that unlike anatomy, perspective, composition or color theory, you cannot compensate for lack of practice with study or reasoning. This is because all the magic in drawing lines happens from your shoulder to your fingers, very little of it happens in your head, and your lines improve with practice.
On the other hand, this can be a blessing. You don’t need to worry about whether you are smart enough, or are creative enough to be a good inker. Just dedicated. Doubtlessly, inking is the Hufflepuff of drawing disciplines.
......@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ The downside of these is that they cannot have line-variation, making them a bit
You can also make small bezier curves with the :ref:`assistant_tool`, amongst the other tools there.
Then, in the freehand brush tool options, you can tick **Assistants** and start a line that snaps to this assistant.
Then, in the freehand brush tool options, you can tick :guilabel:`Snap to Assistants` and start a line that snaps to this assistant.
Presets
-------
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