Commit 70e1a917 authored by Antoni Bella Pérez's avatar Antoni Bella Pérez 🚵🏻 Committed by Raghavendra Kamath

Documentation fixes

* Minor fixes
* Inspect in all RST files for unify the style:
  - change http: to https: (if it's possible)
  - fix the shorcuts and keys (:kbd:)
  - fix end lines with space and point ( .)
parent 5ac16554
......@@ -221,7 +221,7 @@ Where can I find older versions of Krita?
All the older versions of Krita that are still available can be found here:
- `Very old builds <http://download.kde.org/Attic/krita>`_
- `Very old builds <https://download.kde.org/Attic/krita/>`_
On Windows, the Krita User Interface is too small on my HiDPI screen
--------------------------------------------------------------------
......@@ -265,11 +265,11 @@ First, check if you have installed drivers and the like. The :ref:`drawing_table
.. versionchanged:: 4.2
The log viewer got added to Krita in 4.2, so for older versions of Krita, you will need to either run Krita in the terminal if you have Linux or MacOS, or for Windows install `DebugView <http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896647.aspx>`_ from the official Microsoft site, start DebugView and then start Krita.
The log viewer got added to Krita in 4.2, so for older versions of Krita, you will need to either run Krita in the terminal if you have Linux or MacOS, or for Windows install `DebugView <https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/downloads/debugview>`_ from the official Microsoft site, start DebugView and then start Krita.
When using a terminal, make sure to enable 'unlimited scrollback'
#. Press :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift + T`, you will see a message box telling the logging has started.
#. Press the :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift + T` shortcut, you will see a message box telling the logging has started.
#. Try to reproduce your problem, you will be able to see the log being created in the log viewer as you draw.
#. Save the output from the log viewer into a txt file, and attach it to the bugreport.
......@@ -299,9 +299,9 @@ Tablet Pro and the Surface Pro
Unlike Wacom's Companion, the Surface line of tablets doesn't have working hardware buttons. Tablet Pro is a (non-free) utility that puts virtual buttons on screen. Krita 3.1 and above will have predefined shortcut profiles to work with Tablet Pro.
http://tabletpro.net/
https://tabletpro.com/
See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKXZgYqC3tI for instructions.
See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKXZgYqC3tI for instructions.
Weird stuff happens on Windows, like ripples, rings, squiggles or poltergeists
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
......@@ -446,7 +446,7 @@ Kiki is a cybersquirrel. She’s our mascot and has been designed by Tyson Tan.
Why is Krita Free?
------------------
Krita is developed as `free software <http://www.gnu.org/>`_ within the KDE community. We believe that good tools should be available for all artists. You can also buy Krita on the Windows Store if you want to support Krita's development or want to have automatic updates to newer versions.
Krita is developed as `free software <https://www.gnu.org/>`_ within the KDE community. We believe that good tools should be available for all artists. You can also buy Krita on the Windows Store if you want to support Krita's development or want to have automatic updates to newer versions.
Can I use Krita commercially?
-----------------------------
......@@ -466,7 +466,7 @@ Not at this point in time.
Who translates Krita
--------------------
Krita is a `KDE application <http://www.kde.org/>`_ — and proud of it! That means that Krita’s translations are done by `KDE localization teams <http://i18n.kde.org/>`_. If you want to help out, join the team for your language! There is another way you can help out making Krita look good in any language, and that is join the development team and fix issues within the code that make Krita harder to translate.
Krita is a `KDE application <https://www.kde.org/>`_ — and proud of it! That means that Krita’s translations are done by `KDE localization teams <https://l10n.kde.org/>`_. If you want to help out, join the team for your language! There is another way you can help out making Krita look good in any language, and that is join the development team and fix issues within the code that make Krita harder to translate.
Reference
=========
......
......@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ Internet Relay Chat
IRC is the main communication channel. There are IRC clients for every operating system out there, as well as a web client on the krita website.
* Joining IRC: connect to irc.freenode.net, select a unique nickname and join the #krita and ##krita-chat channels. #krita is for on-topic talk, ##krita-chat for off-topic chat.
* Don’t ask to ask: if you’ve got a question, just ask it .
* Don’t ask to ask: if you’ve got a question, just ask it.
* Don’t panic if several discussions happen at the same time. That’s normal in a busy channel.
* Talk to an individual by typing their nick and a colon.
* Almost every Monday, at 14:00 CET or CEST, we have a meeting where we discuss what happened in the past week, what we’re doing, and everything that’s relevant for the project. The meeting notes are kept in google docs.
......
......@@ -466,4 +466,4 @@ Finished translations also need to be added to the build script to show up onlin
Other
-----
For restructured text conventions, check :ref:`krita_markup_conventions` .
For restructured text conventions, check :ref:`krita_markup_conventions`.
......@@ -28,11 +28,11 @@ So, instead, we'll make a screenshot. Depending on your operating system, there
Windows
~~~~~~~
Windows has a build-in screenshot tool. It is by default on the :kbd:`PrtSc` key. On laptops you will sometimes need to use the :kbd:`Fn` key.
Windows has a build-in screenshot tool. It is by default on the :kbd:`Print Screen` key. On laptops you will sometimes need to use the :kbd:`Fn` key.
Linux
~~~~~
Both Gnome and KDE have decent screenshot tools showing up by default when using the :kbd:`PrtSc` key, as well do other popular desktop environments. If, for whatever reason, you have no
Both Gnome and KDE have decent screenshot tools showing up by default when using the :kbd:`Print Screen` key, as well do other popular desktop environments. If, for whatever reason, you have no
ImageMagick
With imagemagick, you can use the following command::
......@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ There is a whole laundry list of `PNG optimisation tools <https://css-ig.net/png
pngquant --quality=80-100 image.png
Where *image* is replaced with the image file name. When you press :kbd:`Enter`, a new image will appear in the folder with the compressed results.
Where *image* is replaced with the image file name. When you press the :kbd:`Enter` key, a new image will appear in the folder with the compressed results.
PNGQuant works for most images, but some images, like the color selectors don't do well with it, so always double check that the resulting image looks good, otherwise try one of the following options:
`PNGCrush <https://pmt.sourceforge.io/pngcrush/>`_
A lossless PNG compressor. Usage::
......@@ -237,7 +237,7 @@ ImageMagick
For Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0::
convert -set dcterms:license "CC-BY-SA-4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" image.png
convert -set dcterms:license "CC-BY-SA-4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" image.png
The problem with using properties is that they are a non-standard way to define a license, meaning that machines cannot do much with them.
......@@ -250,11 +250,11 @@ We'll need to use the `XMP tags for exiftool <https://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~ph
So that would look something like this::
exiftool -Marked=true -License="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0" -UsageTerms="This work is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/">Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License</a>." -Copyright="CC-BY-SA-NC 4.0" image.png
exiftool -Marked=true -License="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0" -UsageTerms="This work is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/">Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License</a>." -Copyright="CC-BY-SA-NC 4.0" image.png
Another way of doing the marking is::
exiftool -Marked=true -License="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0" -attributionURL="docs.krita.org" attributionName="kritaManual" image.png
exiftool -Marked=true -License="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0" -attributionURL="docs.krita.org" attributionName="kritaManual" image.png
With imagemagick you can use the profile option again.
First extract the data (if there is any)::
......
......@@ -231,7 +231,7 @@ LUT docker manipulations are per view, so you can create a new view and set it t
Another example is to carefully watch the gradients in a certain section.
Like ICC, the LUT Docker allows you to create a profile of sorts for your device. In this case it's the 'lut', which stands for 'Look Up Table', and which can be added to OCIO by modifying the configuration file. When OCIO is turned on, the configuration in :menuselection:`Settings --> Configure Krita --> Color Management` is turned off, unless you are using the :guilabel:`Internal` color engine.
Like ICC, the LUT Docker allows you to create a profile of sorts for your device. In this case it's the 'LUT', which stands for 'Look Up Table', and which can be added to OCIO by modifying the configuration file. When OCIO is turned on, the configuration in :menuselection:`Settings --> Configure Krita --> Color Management` is turned off, unless you are using the :guilabel:`Internal` color engine.
In summary
----------
......@@ -243,7 +243,7 @@ Krita has two modes of color management:
* both can be made with a colorimeter.
* If you want to have a properly color managed workflow, you have one made customary for the input device (your screen) and the output devices (your printer, or target screen). For web the output is always sRGB.
* Set up your screen profiles under :menuselection:`Settings --> Configure Krita --> Color management`.
* Do NOT use screen profiles or other device profiles to draw in. Use a working space profile such as any of the elle profiles for this, as the color maths will be much more predictable and pleasant. Krita will convert between your screen and working space on the fly, allowing you to pick the correct colors. This turns your screen into binoculars to view the image.
* Do NOT use screen profiles or other device profiles to draw in. Use a working space profile such as any of the 'elle' profiles for this, as the color maths will be much more predictable and pleasant. Krita will convert between your screen and working space on the fly, allowing you to pick the correct colors. This turns your screen into binoculars to view the image.
* Use the appropriate color management for the appropriate workflow. If you are working with Blender, you will be better off using OCIO, than ICC. If you are working with Scribus or Photoshop, use ICC.
Krita does a lot of color maths, often concerning the blending of colors. This color maths works best in linear color space, and linear color space requires a bit depth of at the least 16bit to work correctly. The disadvantage is that linear space can be confusing to work in.
......@@ -280,7 +280,7 @@ If you are preparing an image for the web:
If you are preparing for print:
* You hopefully made the picture in a working space profile instead of the actual custom profile of your screen, if not, convert it to something like Adobe RGB, sRGB or rec2020.
* You hopefully made the picture in a working space profile instead of the actual custom profile of your screen, if not, convert it to something like Adobe RGB, sRGB or Rec. 2020.
* Check with the printer what kind of image they expect. Maybe they expect sRGB color space, or perhaps they have their own profile.
Interaction with other applications
......@@ -339,7 +339,7 @@ Print
Input
Your screen profile. (You pick colors via your screen)
Workingspace
sRGB or rec2020 if you can afford the bit-depth being 16bit.
sRGB or Rec. 2020 if you can afford the bit-depth being 16bit.
Output
Specialized CMYK profile from the printing house for the printed images.
......
......@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ Glazing
In traditional painting, **glazing** is overlaying many different semi-transparent layers to create on-canvas color mixtures. Likewise, in digital painting we can also use glazing to mix colors directly on our canvas. This is one of the most fundamental and commonly used mixing techniques in digital painting.
We first lay down a semi-transparent layer on top of another color that we intend to mix with. Then, we pick the **resultant color** with :kbd:`Ctrl` + |mouseleft| (this can be configured in the canvas input settings), and paint with that. Depending on our brush's **opacity setting**, each time we glaze one color over another we will get a color that is somewhere between those two colors, often leading to a nice mixture.
We first lay down a semi-transparent layer on top of another color that we intend to mix with. Then, we pick the **resultant color** with the :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| shortcut (this can be configured in the canvas input settings), and paint with that. Depending on our brush's **opacity setting**, each time we glaze one color over another we will get a color that is somewhere between those two colors, often leading to a nice mixture.
We can mix even more easily with glazing when we set our brush's **flow** to a lower setting. Subtly different than opacity, :ref:`flow <option_opacity_n_flow>` is transparency per dab instead of stroke, and so it gives us softer strokes without giving up control.
......
......@@ -32,8 +32,8 @@ The following table shows how there's a lot of space being used by lighter value
.. image:: /images/color_category/trc_gray_gradients.svg
:align: center
If you look at linear of rec 709 TRCs, you can see there's quite a jump between the darker shades and the lighter shades, while if we look at the Lab L* TRC or the sRGB TRC, which seem more evenly spaced.
This is due to our eyes' sensitivity to darker values. This also means that if you do not have enough bit depth, an image in a linear space will look as if it has ugly banding. Hence why, when we make images for viewing on a screen, we always use something like the LAB L\*, sRGB or Gamma 2.2 TRCs to encode the image with.
If you look at linear of Rec. 709 TRCs, you can see there's quite a jump between the darker shades and the lighter shades, while if we look at the Lab L* TRC or the sRGB TRC, which seem more evenly spaced.
This is due to our eyes' sensitivity to darker values. This also means that if you do not have enough bit depth, an image in a linear space will look as if it has ugly banding. Hence why, when we make images for viewing on a screen, we always use something like the Lab L\*, sRGB or Gamma 2.2 TRCs to encode the image with.
However, this modification to give more space to darker values does lead to wonky color maths when mixing the colors.
......@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ Then we fill in the values into the correct spot. Compare these to the values of
And this is why color mixtures are lighter and softer in linear space. Linear space is more physically correct, but sRGB is more efficient in terms of space, so hence why many images have an sRGB TRC encoded into them.
In case this still doesn't make sense: *sRGB gives largely* **darker** *values than linear space for the same coordinates*.
So different TRCs give different mixes between colors, in the following example, every set of gradients is in order a mix using linear TRC, a mix using sRGB TRC and a mix using LAB L* TRC.
So different TRCs give different mixes between colors, in the following example, every set of gradients is in order a mix using linear TRC, a mix using sRGB TRC and a mix using Lab L* TRC.
.. image:: /images/color_category/3trcsresult.png
......
......@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ If you divide it choosing steps at a regular interval, you get what is called a
With 8bit/channel bit depth, we have only 256 values to store this whole line.
If we use a linear profile as described above to define those color values, we will miss some important visible color change steps and have a big number of values looking the same (leading to posterization effect).
This is why was created the sRGB profile to fit more different colors in this limited amount of values, in a perceptually regular grading, by applying a custom gamma curve (see picture here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SRGB) to emulate the standard response curve of old CRT screens.
This is why was created the sRGB profile to fit more different colors in this limited amount of values, in a perceptually regular grading, by applying a custom gamma curve (see picture here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SRGB) to emulate the standard response curve of old CRT screens.
So sRGB profile is optimized to fit all colors that most common screen can reproduce in those 256 values per R/G/B channels.
Some other profiles like Adobe RGB are optimized to fit more printable colors in this limited range, primarily extending cyan-green hues. Working with such profile can be useful to improve print results, but is dangerous if not used with a properly profiled and/or calibrated good display.
Most common CMYK workspace profile can usually fit all their colors within 8bit/channel depth, but they are all so different and specific that it's usually better to work with a regular RGB workspace first and then convert the output to the appropriate CMYK profile.
......
......@@ -21,11 +21,11 @@ Previously referred to as HDR painting and Scene Referred painting, Scene Linear
These are the two important characteristics. The colorspace has a few more properties than this, such as the white point, or more importantly, the colorants that make up the gamut. But here’s the thing, those two could be anything, as long as the space is linear and the color depth is floating point.
So, *Scene Linear is not a single one colorspace, but a* **TYPE** *of colorspace*. You can have a scene linear space that uses the sRGB/rec 709 colorants, or one that uses adobeRGB, or maybe one that uses rec 2020, as long as it is *linear* and in a *floating point bit depth*.
So, *Scene Linear is not a single one colorspace, but a* **TYPE** *of colorspace*. You can have a scene linear space that uses the sRGB/Rec. 709 colorants, or one that uses adobeRGB, or maybe one that uses Rec. 2020, as long as it is *linear* and in a *floating point bit depth*.
.. Note::
If you want to create images for display on an HDR canvas, you will need to select the rec 2020 space profile with a linear gamma. The default profile in Krita for that is :guilabel:`Rec2020-elle-V4-g10.icc`.
If you want to create images for display on an HDR canvas, you will need to select the Rec. 2020 space profile with a linear gamma. The default profile in Krita for that is :guilabel:`Rec2020-elle-V4-g10.icc`.
These two factors are for one reason: To make black and white arbitrary values. This might seem a bit weird. But when you are dealing with light-sources, you are dealing with a massive range of contrasts, and will have to decide afterwards which white and black you’d like to have. This is what the scene means in scene-linear, the relevant values are unique per scene, like a real world scene: a flower field lit by moonlight, a city in twilight or a sunny beach. You want to be able to put the right emphasis on the most important contrasting values, and being able to choose what is white and what is black is a very powerful tool here. After all, humans in the real world can see much more when they get used to the dark, or to the sun, so why not apply that to how we make our images?
......@@ -69,14 +69,14 @@ A very simple but massive problem is one with **inversion**. Inverting colors is
* Overlay (screens values below midtone-value, in sRGB this would be middle gray)
* Color-dodge (divides the lower color with an inversion of the top one)
* Color-burn (inverts the lower color and then divides it by the top color)
* Hardlight (A different way of doing overlay, including the inversion)
* Softlight (Uses several inversions along the way)
* Hardlight (a different way of doing overlay, including the inversion)
* Softlight (uses several inversions along the way)
Conversely Multiply, Linear Dodge/Addition (they’re the same thing), Subtract, Divide, Darker (only compares colors’ channel values), Lighter (ditto), and Difference *are fine to use*, as long as the program you use doesn’t do weird clipping there.
Another one is HSL, HSI and HSY algorithms. They too need to assume something about the top value to allow scaling to white. HSV doesn’t have this problem. So it’s best to use an HSV color selector.
For the blending modes that use HSY, there’s always the issue that they tend to be hardcoded to sRGB/Rec709 values, but are otherwise fine (and they give actually far more correct results in a linear space). So these are not a good idea to use with wide-gamut colorspaces, and due to the assumption about black and white, not with scene linear painting. The following blending modes use them:
For the blending modes that use HSY, there’s always the issue that they tend to be hardcoded to sRGB/Rec. 709 values, but are otherwise fine (and they give actually far more correct results in a linear space). So these are not a good idea to use with wide-gamut colorspaces, and due to the assumption about black and white, not with scene linear painting. The following blending modes use them:
* Color
* Luminosity
......@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ In Summary
Scene Linear Painting is painting an image in a color space that is linear and has a floating point bit depth. This does not assume anything about the values of black and white, so you can only use tools that don’t assume anything about the values of black and white. It has the advantage of having nicer filter results and better color mixtures as well as better interoperability with other scene-linear output.
To be able to view such an image you use a view transform, also called a display conversion. Which means that if you wish to finalize your image for the web, you make a copy of the image that goes through a display conversion or view transform that then gets saved to png or jpeg or tiff.
To be able to view such an image you use a view transform, also called a display conversion. Which means that if you wish to finalize your image for the web, you make a copy of the image that goes through a display conversion or view transform that then gets saved to PNG, JPEG or TIFF.
Getting to actual painting
--------------------------
......@@ -124,9 +124,9 @@ Now we’ve covered the theory, let us look at a workflow for painting scene lin
Setting up the Canvas
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Select either a 16bit or 32bit image. By default Krita will select a linear sRGB profile. If you want to create images for HDR display, you will need to make sure that the profile selected is the :guilabel:`Rec2020-elle-V4-g10.icc` profile. HDR images are standardised to use the rec 2020 gamut, which is much larger than sRGB in size, so this ensures you've got access to all the colors.
Select either a 16bit or 32bit image. By default Krita will select a linear sRGB profile. If you want to create images for HDR display, you will need to make sure that the profile selected is the :guilabel:`Rec2020-elle-V4-g10.icc` profile. HDR images are standardised to use the Rec. 2020 gamut, which is much larger than sRGB in size, so this ensures you've got access to all the colors.
If you're working on a non-HDR enabled monitor, you should enable ocio in the Lut Docker.
If you're working on a non-HDR enabled monitor, you should enable OCIO in the LUT docker.
Keep in mind everything mentioned above. Not all filters and not all blending modes work. This will improve in the future. Other than that, everything else is the same.
......@@ -137,17 +137,17 @@ Picking regular colors is easy, but how do we pick the really bright colors? The
#. By lowering the exposure in the LUT docker. This will increase the visible range of colors in the color selectors. You can even hotkey the exposure in the canvas input settings.
#. By setting the nits slider in the :ref:`small_color_selector` higher than 100.
#. Or simply by opening the internal color selector by double clicking the dual color button and typing in values higher than 1 into the field.
#. Or simply by opening the internal color selector by double clicking the dual color button and typing in values higher than 1 into the input field.
#. And finally by picking a really bright color from an image that has such values.
Then paint. It’s recommended to make a bunch of swatches in the corner, at the least, until Krita’s new palette docker allows you to save the values properly.
Then paint. It’s recommended to make a bunch of swatches in the corner, at the least, until Krita’s new Palette docker allows you to save the values properly.
Lighting based workflow
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
So, we have our typical value based workflow, where we only paint the grays of the image so that we can focus on the values of the image. We can do something similar with Scene Linear Painting.
Where with the value based workflow you paint the image as if it were a grayscale of what you intended to paint, with a lighting based workflow you paint as if all the objects are white. The effect of the color of an object can be determined by multiplying its base color with the color of the light. So you could paint objects as if they were white, paint the colors on a separate layer and just use the multiply blending mode to get the right colors.
Where with the value based workflow you paint the image as if it were a grayscale of what you intended to paint, with a lighting based workflow you paint as if all the objects are white. The effect of the color of an object can be determined by multiplying its base color with the color of the light. So you could paint objects as if they were white, paint the colors on a separate layer and just use the Multiply blending mode to get the right colors.
.. figure:: /images/color_category/Krita_scenelinear_cat_02.png
:align: center
......@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@ The keen minded will notice that a lighting based workflow kind of resembles the
Finishing up
~~~~~~~~~~~~
When you are done, you will want to apply the view transform you have been using to the image (at the least, if you want to post the end result on the internet)... This is called LUT baking and not possible yet in Krita. Therefore you will have to save out your image in EXR and open it in either Blender or Natron. Then, in Blender it is enough to just use the same OCIO config, select the right values and save the result as a png.
When you are done, you will want to apply the view transform you have been using to the image (at the least, if you want to post the end result on the Internet)... This is called LUT baking and not possible yet in Krita. Therefore you will have to save out your image in EXR and open it in either Blender or Natron. Then, in Blender it is enough to just use the same OCIO config, select the right values and save the result as a PNG.
For saving HDR images, check the :ref:`hdr_display` page.
......
......@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ Alright, so, let's make an isometric out of our boy then.
We make a new document, and add a vector layer.
On the vector layer, we select the straight line tool, start a line and then hold :kbd:`Shift` to make it snap to angles. This'll allow us to make a 30° setup like above:
On the vector layer, we select the straight line tool, start a line and then hold the :kbd:`Shift` key to make it snap to angles. This'll allow us to make a 30° setup like above:
.. image:: /images/category_projection/projection_image_15.png
:align: center
......@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ Then crop it by setting the crop tool to :guilabel:`Layer`, and use :menuselecti
.. tip::
To resize a vector but keep its angle, you just select it with the shape handling tool (the white arrow) drag on the corners of the bounding box to start moving them, and then press :kbd:`Shift` to constrain the ratio. This'll allow you to keep the angle.
To resize a vector but keep its angle, you just select it with the shape handling tool (the white arrow) drag on the corners of the bounding box to start moving them, and then press the :kbd:`Shift` key to constrain the ratio. This'll allow you to keep the angle.
The lower image is 'the back seen from the front', we'll be using this to determine where the ear should go.
......@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ Our game-safe isometric has its angle at two pixels horizontal is one pixel vert
.. image:: /images/category_projection/projection_image_24.png
:align: center
Use the grid to setup two parallel rulers that represent both diagonals (you can snap them with the :kbd:`Shift + S`):
Use the grid to setup two parallel rulers that represent both diagonals (you can snap them with the :kbd:`Shift + S` shortcut):
.. image:: /images/category_projection/projection_image_25.png
:align: center
......
......@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ First, let's prepare our front and side views:
.. image:: /images/category_projection/projection_image_01.png
:align: center
I always start with the side, and then extrapolate the front view from it. Because you are using Krita, set up two parallel rulers, one vertical and the other horizontal. To snap them perfectly, drag one of the nodes after you have made the ruler, and press :kbd:`Shift` to snap it horizontal or vertical. In 3.0, you can also snap them to the image borders if you have :menuselection:`Snap Image Bounds` active via :kbd:`Shift` + :kbd:`S`
I always start with the side, and then extrapolate the front view from it. Because you are using Krita, set up two parallel rulers, one vertical and the other horizontal. To snap them perfectly, drag one of the nodes after you have made the ruler, and press the :kbd:`Shift` key to snap it horizontal or vertical. In 3.0, you can also snap them to the image borders if you have :menuselection:`Snap Image Bounds` active via the :kbd:`Shift + S` shortcut.
Then, by moving the mirror to the left, you can design a front view from the side view, while the parallel preview line helps you with aligning the eyes (which in the above screenshot are too low).
......
......@@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ Let’s setup our perspective projection again…
We’ll be using a single vanishing point for our focal point. A guide line will be there for the projection plane, and we’re setting up horizontal and vertical parallel rules to easily draw the straight lines from the view plane to where they intersect.
And now the workflow in gif-format… (don’t forget you can rotate the canvas with :kbd:`4` and :kbd:`6`)
And now the workflow in GIF format… (don’t forget you can rotate the canvas with the :kbd:`4` and :kbd:`6` keys)
.. image:: /images/category_projection/projection_animation_03.gif
:align: center
......
......@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ Generally, it’s worth exploring, if only because it improves your spatial sens
.. seealso::
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axonometric_projection
* http://blenderartists.org/forum/showthread.php?148878-Creating-an-Isometric-Camera
* https://blenderartists.org/t/creating-an-isometric-camera/440743
* http://flarerpg.org/tutorials/isometric_tiles/
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isometric_graphics_in_video_games_and_pixel_art
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lens_%28optics%29
......@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ This filter seems to both multiply and respect the alpha of the input.
Combine Normal Map
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mathematically robust blending mode for normal maps, using `Reoriented Normal Map Blending <http://blog.selfshadow.com/publications/blending-in-detail/>`_.
Mathematically robust blending mode for normal maps, using `Reoriented Normal Map Blending <https://blog.selfshadow.com/publications/blending-in-detail/>`_.
.. index:: ! Copy (Blending Mode)
.. _bm_copy:
......
......@@ -35,11 +35,11 @@ Usage and Hotkeys
To see the source, you need to set the brush-cursor settings to brush outline.
The clone tool can now clone from the projection and it's possible to change the clone source layer. Press :kbd:`Ctrl + Alt +` |mouseleft| to select a new clone source on the current layer. :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| to select a new clone source point on the layer that was active when you selected the clone op.
The clone tool can now clone from the projection and it's possible to change the clone source layer. Press the :kbd:`Ctrl + Alt +` |mouseleft| shortcut to select a new clone source on the current layer. The :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| shortcut to select a new clone source point on the layer that was active when you selected the clone op.
.. warning::
:kbd:`Ctrl + Alt +` |mouseleft| is temporarily disabled on 2.9.7.
The :kbd:`Ctrl + Alt +` |mouseleft| shortcut is temporarily disabled on 2.9.7.
Settings
--------
......
......@@ -311,7 +311,7 @@ Suppose you want more or less smooth color transitions. You can either:
This remains, in fact, a so-so way of making smooth transitions. It's best to build up intermediate values instead. Here:
* I first passed over the blue area three times with a red color. I select 3 shades.
* I color picked each of these values with :kbd:`Ctrl` + |mouseleft|, then used them in succession.
* I color picked each of these values with the :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| shortcut, then used them in succession.
.. image:: /images/brushes/Krita-tutorial5-III.2-2.png
......
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ Create New Document
A new document can be created as follows.
#. Click on :guilabel:`File` from the application menu at the top.
#. Then click on :guilabel:`New`. Or you can do this by pressing :kbd:`Ctrl + N`.
#. Then click on :guilabel:`New`. Or you can do this by pressing the :kbd:`Ctrl + N` shortcut.
#. Now you will get a New Document dialog box as shown below:
.. image:: /images/Krita_newfile.png
......
......@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ HSL
HSI
This stands for Hue, Saturation and Intensity. Unlike HSL, this one determine the intensity as the sum of total rgb components. Yellow (1,1,0) has higher intensity than blue (0,0,1) but is the same intensity as cyan (0,1,1).
HSY'
Stands for Hue, Saturation, Luma, with Luma being an RGB approximation of true luminosity. (Luminosity being the measurement of relative lightness). HSY' uses the Luma Coefficients, like `Rec 709 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rec._709>`_, to calculate the Luma. Due to this, HSY' can be the most intuitive selector to work with, or the most confusing.
Stands for Hue, Saturation, Luma, with Luma being an RGB approximation of true luminosity. (Luminosity being the measurement of relative lightness). HSY' uses the Luma Coefficients, like `Rec. 709 <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rec._709>`_, to calculate the Luma. Due to this, HSY' can be the most intuitive selector to work with, or the most confusing.
Then, under shape, you can select one of the shapes available within that color model.
......@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ Then, under shape, you can select one of the shapes available within that color
Luma Coefficients
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This allows you to edit the Luma coefficients for the HSY model selectors to your leisure. Want to use `Rec 601 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rec._601>`_ instead of Rec 709? These boxes allow you to do that!
This allows you to edit the Luma coefficients for the HSY model selectors to your leisure. Want to use `Rec. 601 <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rec._601>`_ instead of Rec. 709? These boxes allow you to do that!
By default, the Luma coefficients should add up to 1 at maximum.
......@@ -96,7 +96,7 @@ If your have set the docker size considerably smaller to save space, this option
* on mouse over
* never
The size given here, is also the size of the Main Color Selector and the MyPaint Shade Selector when they are called with :kbd:`Shift + I` and :kbd:`Shift + M`, respectively.
The size given here, is also the size of the Main Color Selector and the MyPaint Shade Selector when they are called with the :kbd:`Shift + I` and :kbd:`Shift + M` shortcuts, respectively.
Hide Pop-up on click
This allows you to let the pop-up selectors called with the above hotkeys to disappear upon clicking them instead of having to leave the pop-up boundary. This is useful for faster working.
......@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ MyPaint Shade Selector
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ported from MyPaint, and extended with all color models.
Default hotkey is :kbd:`Shift+ M`.
Default hotkey is :kbd:`Shift + M`.
Simple Shade Selector
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
......@@ -148,12 +148,12 @@ Update After Every Stroke
History patches
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The history patches remember which colors you've drawn on canvas with. They can be quickly called with :kbd:`H`.
The history patches remember which colors you've drawn on canvas with. They can be quickly called with the :kbd:`H` key.
Common Patches
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The common patches are generated from the image, and are the most common color in the image. The hotkey for them on canvas is :kbd:`U`.
The common patches are generated from the image, and are the most common color in the image. The hotkey for them on canvas is the :kbd:`U` key.
Gamut masking
-------------
......
......@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ Grids in Krita can currently only be orthogonal and diagonal. There is a single
Show Grid
Shows or hides the grid.
Snap to Grid
Toggles grid snapping on or off. This can also be achieved with :kbd:`Shift + S`.
Toggles grid snapping on or off. This can also be achieved with the :kbd:`Shift + S` shortcut.
Type
The type of Grid
......
......@@ -23,10 +23,10 @@ The Layers docker is for one of the core concepts of Krita: :ref:`Layer Manageme
The Layer Stack
---------------
You can select the active layer here. Using :kbd:`Shift` and :kbd:`Ctrl` you can select multiple layers and drag-and-drop them. You can also change the visibility, edit state, alpha inheritance and rename layers. You can open and close groups, and you can drag and drop layers, either to reorder them, or to put them in groups.
You can select the active layer here. Using the :kbd:`Shift` and :kbd:`Ctrl` keys you can select multiple layers and drag-and-drop them. You can also change the visibility, edit state, alpha inheritance and rename layers. You can open and close groups, and you can drag and drop layers, either to reorder them, or to put them in groups.
Name
The Layer name, just do double- |mouseleft| to make it editable, and press :kbd:`Enter` to finish editing.
The Layer name, just do double- |mouseleft| to make it editable, and press the :kbd:`Enter` key to finish editing.
Label
This is a color that you can set on the layer. |mouseright| the layer to get a context menu to assign a color to it. You can then later filter on these colors.
Blending Mode
......@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ Onion Skin
Layer Style
This is only available on layers which have a :ref:`layer_style` assigned. The button allows you to switch between on/off quickly.
To edit these properties on multiple layers at once, press the properties option when you have multiple layers selected or press :kbd:`F3`.
To edit these properties on multiple layers at once, press the properties option when you have multiple layers selected or press the :kbd:`F3` key.
There, to change the names of all layers, the checkbox before :guilabel:`Name` should be ticked after which you can type in a name. Krita will automatically add a number behind the layer names. You can change other layer properties like visibility, opacity, lock states, etc. too.
.. image:: /images/layers/Krita-multi-layer-edit.png
......@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ These are buttons for doing layer operations.
Add
Will by default add a new Paint Layer, but using the little arrow, you can call a sub-menu with the other layer types.
Duplicate
Will Duplicate the active layer(s). Can be quickly invoked with :kbd:`Ctrl` + |mouseleft| + drag.
Will Duplicate the active layer(s). Can be quickly invoked with the :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| :kbd:`+ drag` shortcut.
Move layer up.
Will move the active layer up. Will switch them out and in groups when coming across them.
Move layer down.
......@@ -76,17 +76,17 @@ Delete
Hot keys and Sticky Keys
------------------------
* :kbd:`Shift` for selecting multiple contiguous layers.
* :kbd:`Ctrl` for select or deselect layer without affecting other layers selection.
* :kbd:`Ctrl` + |mouseleft| + drag - makes a duplicate of the selected layers, for you to drag and drop.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + E` for merging a layer down. This also merges selected layers, layer styles and will keep selection masks intact. Using :kbd:`Ctrl + E` on a single layer with a mask will merge down the mask into the layer.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift + E` merges all layers.
* :kbd:`R` + |mouseleft| allows you to select layers on canvas, similar to picking colors directly on canvas. Use :kbd:`Shift + R` + |mouseleft| for multiple layers.
* :kbd:`Ins` for adding a new layer.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + G` will create a group layer. If multiple layers are selected, they are put into the group layer.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift + G` will quickly set-up a clipping group, with the selected layers added into the group, and a new layer added on top with alpha-inheritance turned on, ready for painting!
* :kbd:`Ctrl + Alt + G` will ungroup layers inside a group.
* :kbd:`Alt` + |mouseleft| for isolated view of a layer. This will maintain between layers till the same action is repeated again.
* :kbd:`Page Up` and :kbd:`Page Down` for switching between layers.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + Page Up` and :kbd:`Ctrl + Page Down` will move the selected layers up and down.
* :kbd:`Shift` key for selecting multiple contiguous layers.
* :kbd:`Ctrl` key for select or deselect layer without affecting other layers selection.
* :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| :kbd:`+ drag` shortcut makes a duplicate of the selected layers, for you to drag and drop.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + E` shortcut for merging a layer down. This also merges selected layers, layer styles and will keep selection masks intact. Using the :kbd:`Ctrl + E` shortcut on a single layer with a mask will merge down the mask into the layer.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift + E` shortcut merges all layers.
* :kbd:`R +` |mouseleft| shortcut allows you to select layers on canvas, similar to picking colors directly on canvas. Use the :kbd:`Shift + R +` |mouseleft| shortcut for multiple layers.
* :kbd:`Ins` key for adding a new layer.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + G` shortcut will create a group layer. If multiple layers are selected, they are put into the group layer.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift + G` shortcut will quickly set-up a clipping group, with the selected layers added into the group, and a new layer added on top with alpha-inheritance turned on, ready for painting!
* :kbd:`Ctrl + Alt + G` shortcut will ungroup layers inside a group.
* :kbd:`Alt +` |mouseleft| shortcut for isolated view of a layer. This will maintain between layers till the same action is repeated again.
* :kbd:`Page Up` and :kbd:`Page Down` keys for switching between layers.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + Page Up` and :kbd:`Ctrl + Page Down` shortcuts will move the selected layers up and down.
......@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ Components
Allows you to study a single channel of your image with LUT.
Exposure
Set the general exposure. On 0.0 at default.
There's :kbd:`Y` to change this on the fly on canvas.
There's the :kbd:`Y` key to change this on the fly on canvas.
Gamma
Allows you to set the gamma. This is 1.0 by default. You can set this to change on the fly in canvas shortcuts.
Lock color
......
......@@ -21,4 +21,4 @@ This docker allows you to select the global pattern. Using the open-file button
* |mouseright| a swatch will allow you to set tags.
* |mouseleft| a swatch will allow you to set it as global pattern.
* :kbd:`Ctrl` + Scroll you can resize the swatch sizes.
* :kbd:`Ctrl + scroll` you can resize the swatch sizes.
......@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ Legend:
**B. Frame Table --** The Frame Table is a large grid of cells which can either hold a single frame or be empty. Each row of the Frame Table represents an *animation layer* and each column represents a *frame timing*. Just like the Layer List, the active layer is highlighted across the entire Frame Table. It's important to understand that frame timings are not based on units of time like seconds, but are based on frames which can then be played back at any speed, depending on the :ref:`animation_docker`'s *frame rate* and *play speed* settings.
Frames can be moved around the timeline by simply left-clicking and dragging from one frame to another slot, even across layers. Furthermore, holding :kbd:`Ctrl` while moving creates a copy. Right-clicking anywhere in the Frame Table will bring up a helpful context menu for adding, removing, copying, and pasting frames or adjusting timing with holds.
Frames can be moved around the timeline by simply left-clicking and dragging from one frame to another slot, even across layers. Furthermore, holding the :kbd:`Ctrl` key while moving creates a copy. Right-clicking anywhere in the Frame Table will bring up a helpful context menu for adding, removing, copying, and pasting frames or adjusting timing with holds.
* **Current Selection:**
Frames highlighted in orange represent a selection or multiple selections, which can be created by mouse or keyboard. While multiple frames are selected, right-clicking anywhere in the Frame Table will bring up a context menu that will allow for adding or removing frames or holds within the current selection. Finally, it is also possible to have multiple non-contiguous/separate selections if needed.
......@@ -104,25 +104,25 @@ GUI Actions:
#. **Frame Timing Header**
* |mouseleft| : Move to time and select frame of the active layer.
* |mouseleft| :kbd:`drag` : Scrub through time and select frame of the active layer.
* |mouseleft| :kbd:`+ drag` : Scrub through time and select frame of the active layer.
* |mouseright| : Frame Columns Menu (insert/remove/copy/paste columns and hold columns).
#. **Frames Table: all**
* |mouseleft| : Selects a single frame or slot and switches time, but *does not switch active layer*.
* :kbd:`Space` + |mouseleft| : Pan.
* :kbd:`Space` + |mouseright| : Zoom.
* :kbd:`Space +` |mouseleft| : Pan.
* :kbd:`Space +` |mouseright| : Zoom.
#. **Frames Table (On Empty Slot).**
* |mouseright| : Frames menu (insert/copy/paste frames and insert/remove holds).
* |mouseleft| + :kbd:`drag` : Select multiple frames and switch time to the last selected, but *does not switch active layer*.
* :kbd:`Shift` + |mouseleft| : Select all frames between the active and the clicked frame.
* :kbd:`Ctrl` + |mouseleft| : Select individual frames together. :kbd:`click+drag` them into place.
* |mouseleft| :kbd:`+ drag` : Select multiple frames and switch time to the last selected, but *does not switch active layer*.
* :kbd:`Shift +` |mouseleft| : Select all frames between the active and the clicked frame.
* :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| : Select individual frames together. :kbd:`click + drag` them into place.
#. **Frames Table (On Existing Frame)**
* |mouseright| : Frames menu (remove/copy/paste frames and insert/remove holds).
* |mouseleft| + :kbd:`drag` : *Move* a frame or multiple frames.
* :kbd:`Ctrl` + |mouseleft| :kbd:`drag` : Copy a frame or multiple frames.
* :kbd:`Alt` + :kbd:`drag` : Move selected frame(s) and *all* the frames to the right of it. (This is useful for when you need to clear up some space in your animation, but don't want to select all the frames to the right of a particular frame!)
* |mouseleft| :kbd:`+ drag` : *Move* a frame or multiple frames.
* :kbd:`Ctrl +` |mouseleft| :kbd:`+ drag` : Copy a frame or multiple frames.
* :kbd:`Alt + drag` : Move selected frame(s) and *all* the frames to the right of it. (This is useful for when you need to clear up some space in your animation, but don't want to select all the frames to the right of a particular frame!)
......@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ Undo History
.. image:: /images/dockers/Krita_Undo_History_Docker.png
This docker allows you to quickly shift between undo states, and even go back in time far more quickly that rapidly reusing :kbd:`Ctrl + Z`.
This docker allows you to quickly shift between undo states, and even go back in time far more quickly that rapidly reusing the :kbd:`Ctrl + Z` shortcut.
.. index:: Cumulate Undo
......
......@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ There are some additions to Krita which makes getting a backtrace much easier on
* If Krita keeps on being unresponsive for more than a few minutes, it might actually be locked up, which may not give a backtrace. In that situation, you have to close Krita manually. Continue to follow the following instructions to check whether it was a crash or not.
#. Open Windows Explorer and type ``%LocalAppData%`` (without quotes) on the address bar and press :kbd:`Enter`.
#. Open Windows Explorer and type ``%LocalAppData%`` (without quotes) on the address bar and press the :kbd:`Enter` key.
.. image:: /images/Mingw-explorer-path.png
......
......@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ Levels
------
This filter allows you to directly modify the levels of the tone-values of an image, by manipulating sliders for highlights, midtones and shadows. You can even set an output and input range of tones for the image. A histogram is displayed to show you the tonal distribution.
The default shortcut for levels filter is :kbd:`Ctrl + L` .
The default shortcut for levels filter is :kbd:`Ctrl + L`.
.. image:: /images/filters/Levels-filter.png
......@@ -118,7 +118,7 @@ Color Balance
-------------
This filter allows you to control the color balance of the image by adjusting the sliders for Shadows, Midtones and Highlights.
The default shortcut for this filter is :kbd:`Ctrl + B` .
The default shortcut for this filter is :kbd:`Ctrl + B`.
.. image:: /images/filters/Color-balance.png
.. index:: Saturation, Desaturation, Gray
......@@ -127,7 +127,7 @@ Desaturate
----------
Image-wide desaturation filter. Will make any image Grayscale.
Has several choices by which logic the colors are turned to gray. The default shortcut for this filter is :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift + U` .
Has several choices by which logic the colors are turned to gray. The default shortcut for this filter is :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift + U`.
.. image:: /images/filters/Desaturate-filter.png
......@@ -164,7 +164,7 @@ Tries to adjust the contrast the universally acceptable levels.
HSV/HSL Adjustment
------------------
With this filter, you can adjust the Hue, Saturation, Value or Lightness, through sliders. The default shortcut for this filter is :kbd:`Ctrl + U` .
With this filter, you can adjust the Hue, Saturation, Value or Lightness, through sliders. The default shortcut for this filter is :kbd:`Ctrl + U`.
.. image:: /images/filters/Hue-saturation-filter.png
......
......@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ Activating Instant Preview
The Global Instant Preview toggle is under the view menu.
Instant Preview is activated in two places: The view menu (:kbd:`Shift + L`), and the settings of the given paintop by default. This is because Instant Preview has different limitations with different paint operations.
Instant Preview is activated in two places: The view menu (:kbd:`Shift + L` shortcut), and the settings of the given paintop by default. This is because Instant Preview has different limitations with different paint operations.
For example, the overlay mode in the color smudge brush will disable the ability to have Instant Preview on the brush, so does using 'fade' sensor for size.
......
......@@ -16,6 +16,6 @@
Group Layers
============
While working in complex artwork you'll often find the need to group the layers or some portions and elements of the artwork in one unit. Group layers come in handy for this, they allow you to make a segregate the layers, so you can hide these quickly, or so you can apply a mask to all the layers inside this group as if they are one, you can also recursively transform the content of the group... Just drag the mask so it moves to the layer. They are quickly made with :kbd:`Ctrl + G`.
While working in complex artwork you'll often find the need to group the layers or some portions and elements of the artwork in one unit. Group layers come in handy for this, they allow you to make a segregate the layers, so you can hide these quickly, or so you can apply a mask to all the layers inside this group as if they are one, you can also recursively transform the content of the group... Just drag the mask so it moves to the layer. They are quickly made with the :kbd:`Ctrl + G` shortcut.
A thing to note is that the layers inside a group layer are considered separately when the layer gets composited, the layers inside a group are separately composited and then this image is taken in to account when compositing the whole image, while on the contrary, the groups in Photoshop have something called pass-through mode which makes the layer behave as if they are not in a group and get composited along with other layers of the stack. The recent versions of Krita have pass-through mode you can enable it to get similar behavior
......@@ -27,4 +27,4 @@ To deal with these two drawbacks, digital artists will typically work at higher
As long as you have enough resolution / size on your canvas though, and as long as you aren't going to need to go back and tweak an effect you created previously, then a paint layer is usually the type of layer you will want. If you click on the :guilabel:`New layer` icon in the layers docker you'll get a paint layer. Of course you can always choose the :guilabel:`New layer` drop-down to get another type.
The hotkey for adding a new paint layer is :kbd:`Ins`.
The hotkey for adding a new paint layer is the :kbd:`Ins` key.
......@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ Local Selection masks let you remember and recall edit a selection on a layer. T
You can make them by making a selection, and |mouseright| the layer you want to add it to select :menuselection:`Local Selection`.
When isolating a selection mask with :kbd:`Alt` + |mouseleft|, you can perform transformation, deformation and paint operations on the selection layer, modifying the selection.
When isolating a selection mask with the :kbd:`Alt +` |mouseleft| shortcut, you can perform transformation, deformation and paint operations on the selection layer, modifying the selection.
A single layer can contain multiple Local Selection Masks. Repeating. A single layer can contain multiple Local Selection Masks (LSM). This is important because it means that you can, for instance, have several different outline parts of an image and save each as its own LSM and then recall it with a single click. Without using LSM you would have to create layer upon layer for each mask. Not only would this be inefficient for you but also for Krita and the program would slow down trying to keep up with it all. LSM's are one of the most important features in Krita!
......
......@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ How to work with alpha channel of the layer
#. |mouseright| the paint layer in the layers docker.
#. Choose :menuselection:`Split Alpha --> Alpha into Mask`.
#. Use your preferred paint tool to paint on the Transparency Mask. Black paints transparency (see-through), white paints opacity (visible). Gray values paint semi-transparency.
#. If you would like to isolate alpha channel, enter Isolated Mode by |mouseright| + :menuselection:`Isolate Layer` (or :kbd:`Alt` + |mouseleft|).
#. If you would like to isolate alpha channel, enter Isolated Mode by |mouseright| + :menuselection:`Isolate Layer` (or the :kbd:`Alt +` |mouseleft| shortcut).
#. When finished editing the Transparency Mask, |mouseright| on it and select :menuselection:`Split Alpha --> Write as Alpha`.
How to save a PNG texture and keep color values in fully transparent areas
......
......@@ -62,21 +62,21 @@ Transform/Move
.. image:: /images/vector/Transform.png
This feature of the tool allows you to move your object by clicking and dragging your shape around the canvas. Holding :kbd:`Ctrl` will lock your moves to one axis.
This feature of the tool allows you to move your object by clicking and dragging your shape around the canvas. Holding the :kbd:`Ctrl` key will lock your moves to one axis.
Size/Stretch
~~~~~~~~~~~~
.. image:: /images/vector/Resize.png
This feature of the tool allows you to stretch your shape. Selecting a midpoint will allow stretching along one axis. Selecting a corner point will allow stretching across both axis. Holding :kbd:`Shift` will allow you to scale your object. Holding :kbd:`Ctrl` will cause your manipulation to be mirrored across your object.
This feature of the tool allows you to stretch your shape. Selecting a midpoint will allow stretching along one axis. Selecting a corner point will allow stretching across both axis. Holding the :kbd:`Shift` key will allow you to scale your object. Holding the :kbd:`Ctrl` key will cause your manipulation to be mirrored across your object.
Rotate
~~~~~~
.. image:: /images/vector/Rotatevector.png
This feature of the tool will allow you to rotate your object around its center. Holding :kbd:`Ctrl` will cause your rotation to lock to 45 degree angles.
This feature of the tool will allow you to rotate your object around its center. Holding the :kbd:`Ctrl` key will cause your rotation to lock to 45 degree angles.
Skew
~~~~
......@@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ This feature of the tool will allow you to skew your object.
Point and Curve Shape Manipulation
----------------------------------
Double-click on a vector object to edit the specific points or curves which make up the shape. Click and drag a point to move it around the canvas. Click and drag along a line to curve it between two points. Holding :kbd:`Ctrl` will lock your moves to one axis.
Double-click on a vector object to edit the specific points or curves which make up the shape. Click and drag a point to move it around the canvas. Click and drag along a line to curve it between two points. Holding the :kbd:`Ctrl` key will lock your moves to one axis.
.. image:: /images/vector/Pointcurvemanip.png
......
......@@ -18,16 +18,16 @@ Edit Menu
.. glossary::
Undo
Undoes the last action. :kbd:`Ctrl + Z`
Undoes the last action. Shortcut: :kbd:`Ctrl + Z`
Redo
Redoes the last undone action. :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift+ Z`
Redoes the last undone action. Shortcut: :kbd:`Ctrl + Shift+ Z`
Cut
Cuts the selection or layer. :kbd:`Ctrl + X`